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Bon Jovi — News

Bon Jovi — News



Jon Bon Jovi
Musically and philanthropically, Jon Bon Jovi’s work honors the spirit of America and salutes the principles that define our nation. Self-reliance, optimism and community are key concepts he embodies, not just in his music, but also in his charitable efforts. These common threads have resulted in millions of dollars raised while bringing heightened awareness to the issues that adversely impact our society.
Mr. Bon Jovi is Chairman of the Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to bringing about positive change and helping the lives of those in need “one SOUL at a time.” The Soul Foundation focuses on finding solutions to the issues that force families and individuals into economic despair with programs and partnerships targeted at breaking the cycle of poverty and homelessness. To date, Jon Bon Jovi and the Soul Foundation have provided funding for affordable housing and shelter for thousands of low-income individuals and families throughout the country.

Rural Children Isolated in Chronically Poor Communities - Spotlight On Poverty

Rural Children Isolated in Chronically Poor Communities - Spotlight On Poverty



Rural Children Isolated in Chronically Poor Communities

Mil Duncan, University of New Hampshire - Posted February 23, 2015

Children growing up in poor families in poor places face a lifetime of struggle. I have seen children in Appalachian hollows and poor neighborhoods in the Mississippi Delta trapped in struggling families. They attend ineffective schools and prospects in their job-scarce communities are bleak. They will inherit their parents’ poverty unless we make early childhood investments to give them the skills to get ahead, and help their parents achieve some stability to support their children.

My 1999 book Worlds Apart chronicled my research examining why rural poverty persists, based on hundreds of interviews in Appalachia, the Mississippi Delta, and northern New England. In 2013 I returned. A new edition of Worlds Apart describes how the communities have changed and how the poor fare now.
  
In the 1990s the Appalachian coal and Delta plantation communities were starkly divided into the haves and have-nots. They attended different schools and different churches. Poor children grew up “rough,” worlds apart from the haves.

A few families controlled the jobs and politics; distrust and corruption undermined community institutions and blocked reform. The disadvantaged dropped out, had children young and out of wedlock, and, like their parents, faced a lifetime of “scratching” to make ends meet.

In contrast, in the more prosperous New England mill community, a blue-collar middle class invested in community-wide institutions. Everyone played hockey or participated in scouts together. Poor children were not isolated and had a chance to leave poverty behind.

Two decades later, those differences have shaped how the three communities navigated economic changes sweeping across rural America.

In 2013, poverty was still high and jobs were still scarce in the Appalachian community. The coal industry was down sharply. One-third of families had no worker. Many relied on disability payments. Painkiller addiction ravaged the community. The same families ran things. Many young adults had left, and those who stayed hunkered down with family, struggling to make ends meet. The legacy of disinvestment and vulnerability persisted.

Casinos came to the Delta community fifteen years ago, bringing jobs in kitchens and hotels as well as at poker tables. The new jobs, along with substantial Earned Income Tax Credit participation, reduced the poverty rate from 60 percent to 30 percent by 2010.

The casinos broke the plantation owners’ stranglehold over jobs, and thus over politics, and in 2012, this black-majority county elected an African American board of supervisors determined to invest in poor neighborhoods. But today casino jobs and revenue are down. Public schools continue to struggle to educate poor black students while whites attend private schools. Here too, despite political change and a boost from casinos, the legacy of deep poverty, segregation, and deprivation weighs heavily.

The northern community grappled with the loss of good mill jobs and now relies on prisons, a biofuel plant, and ATV and snowmobile trails. Rents fell after the mills closed and new poor families moved in, alarming long-time residents. “Those people aren’t welcome here,” some said.

But the community worked together to improve deteriorating neighborhoods. Community leaders still value education, and the schools try to support the vulnerable newcomers.
The former mill community, its institutions resilient, is adjusting to a new, less prosperous economy. But what can be done in places like the Appalachian and Delta communities where poverty remains high and critical community institutions are broken?

Fundamental social and political conditions rooted in economic history undermine development efforts and perpetuate poverty in these communities. Building opportunity is hard.

But we have proven programs that invest in poor children’s successful future. Every poor child deserves those investments.

In Appalachia, Gwen, who dropped out and “ran wild” as a teen, was a thirty-year-old mother struggling to raise three kids in the 1990s. She invested in them, coaching on schoolwork, supporting them even as the family “scrounged” day after day. Despite a rocky marriage and little money, she created a stable family. Twenty years later her children were working and their own kids were thriving. But her ability to invest is the exception.

In the Delta in the 1990s, with no institutional support, black organizers mentored poor disconnected youth, guiding kids whose families and schools were chaotic and even violent.  Twenty years later those they mentored were prepared to take the new jobs and establish stable families. But there were many they could not reach.

Rigorous research shows that good two-generation programs help fragile families do what Gwen did on her own. Home visiting and quality early childhood education provide the cognitive and social skills children need to succeed, even when parents struggle with poverty or addiction.

When stressed parents can get mental health and substance abuse services, parenting guidance, and, importantly, adequate income, they can create family stability. And solid mentoring programs can bring to scale what those organizers accomplished in the Delta, helping young people stay on track, finish school, and get work.

Growing up poor in a poor community sets children on the path to repeating their parents’ lives of “scratching.”  My research shows the power of individual parents and mentors. But it takes more than heroic individuals to break the cycle of poverty. We need strong federal and state investment in poor children.

Over 8 million are poor in rural America, and they have too long been invisible and forgotten. While we cannot build a strong, inclusive economy in every remote community, we can invest in children to build their life chances.

To print a PDF of this document, click here.

Mil Duncan is professor emeritus at University of New Hampshire where she served as the founding director of the Carsey Institute, and works with AGree, a food and agriculture policy initiative. Her new edition of Worlds Apart: Poverty and Politics in Rural America is now available.

The views expressed in this commentary are those of the author or authors alone, and not those ofSpotlightSpotlight is a non-partisan initiative, and Spotlight’s commentary section includes diverse perspectives on poverty. If you have a question about a commentary, please don’t hesitate to contact us at commentary@spotlightonpoverty.org. 



If you wish to submit for consideration a commentary to Spotlight, please visit our commentary guidelines and submission page.


From a Spare Bedroom to a Home of Her Own - Housing Assistance Council

From a Spare Bedroom to a Home of Her Own - Housing Assistance Council

Cities as Labs of Innovation: Matt Damon and Gary White - CGI 2014 Annua...

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satelliteima.jpg (500×381)

The Complete Backyard Aquaponics Guide |

The Complete Backyard Aquaponics Guide |



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Xi Jinping Environmental protection is homeland security! Save Earth, by saving forests 1st," China's been damaged by highly polluting, energy-intensive industries, economic development must not come at the price of the ecology

China's Xi Jinping Environmental protection is homeland security! Save Earth, by saving forests 1st," China's been damaged by highly polluting, energy-intensive industries, economic development must not come at the price of the ecology
http://www.drmartinwilliams.com/conservation-and-environment/xi-jinping-talks-up-environmental-protection-in-china.html 2013

Phys.Org Mobile: Satellite images reveal ocean acidification from space

Phys.Org Mobile: Satellite images reveal ocean acidification from space



Why Aquaponics jobs are going to be big in the future!

Phys.Org Mobile: Satellite images reveal ocean acidification from space

Phys.Org Mobile: Satellite images reveal ocean acidification from space

Next-gen sustainability reports: A primer for communications professionals


Next-gen sustainability reports: A primer for communications professionalsWebinar attendees will hear a high-level explanation of the benefits of sustainability reporting and gain understanding from Amsterdam-based Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) of how standards are changing in 2015. 

Content marketing methodology is being used by a growing number of corporations as they share their sustainability data with an online audience. 

AECOM, the global provider of professional technical and management support services to a broad range of markets, will describe how the sustainability report is being retooled to provide a framework for ongoing storytelling through online and social channels. 

Join our presenters -- Ɓsthildur Hjaltadottir, GRI Director Services, and Chinyere Ojini, AECOM Communications Specialist -- and 3BL Media CMO Dave Armon, who will moderate this webinar. 
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https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6352371619910096898

No matter how much work a man can do, no matter how engaging his personality may be, he will not advance far in business if he cannot work through others. - Welcome to Forbes

Welcome to Forbes

No matter how much work a man can do, no matter how engaging his personality may be, he will not advance far in business if he cannot work through others.

Slaves Used To Catch Fish That End Up On U.S. Tables

Slaves Used To Catch Fish That End Up On U.S. Tables

600,000 Baby Salmon Head to the Pacific, With a Little Help

600,000 Baby Salmon Head to the Pacific, With a Little Help

CSRWire News | New Hampshire Businesses for Social Responsibility

CSRWire News | New Hampshire Businesses for Social Responsibility



CSRWire News

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CSRwire Press Releases, Events and Reports
Updated: 1 min 14 sec ago

Ray C. Anderson Foundation Awards $100,000 “NextGen” Grant to Net-Works™

1 min 14 sec ago
The Ray C. Anderson Foundation recently awarded a $100,000 “NextGen” grant to the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) who, in partnership with Interface, Inc., has created an innovative program called Net-Works.  Net-Works is a cross-sector collaboration designed to tackle the growing environmental problem of discarded fishing nets in some of the world’s poorest coastal communities, while at the same time supporting one of Interface’s ambitious Mission Zero® goals to source 100% recycled nylon.  NextGen grants are those awarded by decision of the five adult grandchildren of Ray Anderson, the late founder and chairman of Interface, Inc.
“Net-Works embodies Ray’s idea of what a ‘restorative enterprise’ might look like,” said Jay Lanier, Ray’s grandchild and an account executive of Interface, Inc., remembering a question his grandfather frequently asked: “How do we make the world better with every square yard of carpet that we sell?”
Together, Interface and ZSL are challenging the status quo to reimagine the company’s supply chain in a way that improves its ability to source recycled content, while simultaneously cleaning up oceans and lakes and lifting people from poverty.  It is an ambitious program, and it’s working. To date, they have collected 61,845 kgs (136,345 lbs) of discarded fishing nets, helping 4,500 villagers in 14 collection sites in Danajon Bank and Bantayan Islands, Philippines. Stretched end to end, these nets would reach nearly 1 ½ times around the globe.
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Good Eggs bringing local food to more folks - Brooklyn, NY | Yelp - I love this. It would make the perfect Gift. A Bag or Box of local made goods. I usually give bags of green cleaning supplies or themed breakfast, or romantic evenings. You should add this as a service.

Good Eggs - Bedford Stuyvesant - Brooklyn, NY | Yelp



Specialties

Farmers market meets online grocery - Good Eggs brings local groceries right to you! Shop from over 100 local farmers, bakers, butchers, dairies and more. We'll deliver it all right to your door, or you can swing by our foodhub to pick up your order.

Whether you're looking for local seasonal produce, organic milk and cheese, pastured eggs, free-range chickens, grass-fed meats, sustainably-caught seafood, fresh bread and baked goods (including gluten-free!), handmade baby food, or prepared meals, you'll find delicious options that are all made by local and independent producers!

Unlike CSA boxes, you get to choose exactly what you get. And like a trip to the farmers' market, you can buy as little or as much as you want. Best of all, delivery is free!

We're bringing the best of Brooklyn to your door. Grocery delivery has never been so good.

History

Established in 2011.
Good Eggs was founded in San Francisco with a mission to grow and sustain local food systems worldwide. We started our NY Foodhub in 2013, bringing the best local food to Brooklynites with FREE delivery!

Meet the Business Owner

Rob S.
Rob S.
Business Owner
Prior to the creation of Good Eggs, founders Rob Spiro and Alon Salant were both inspired by agriculture and great food.

Rob helped run a farm in Hopewell Junction, NY, while Alon honed his skills as a backyard farmer mastering a delicious lemon marmalade recipe.

Combining their passion for food and their belief in the transformative power of technology, they founded Good Eggs in 2011 to bring local food to more folks!


READ MORE ABOUT GOOD EGG

“In The Studio,” Skillshare’s Michael Karnjanaprakorn Talks Platforms And Marketplaces | TechCrunch

“In The Studio,” Skillshare’s Michael Karnjanaprakorn Talks Platforms And Marketplaces | TechCrunch



Nice - Great way to enhance home education and viryual public school field trips

Gold in human feces worth millions: Study - The Economic Times

Gold in human feces worth millions: Study - The Economic Times



"WASHINGTON: Human feces contains gold, silver and other metals which could be worth hundreds of millions of dollars, say scientists who are investigating ways to extract the precious metals from poop. 

Treated solid waste contains gold, silver and other metals, as well as rare elements such as palladium and vanadium that are used in electronics and alloys, researchers have found. "


The world's best teacher lives in rural Maine and doesn't care about test scores | Education | The Guardian

The world's best teacher lives in rural Maine and doesn't care about test scores | Education | The Guardian

The naked truth -- advertising's image of women: Jean Kilbourne at TEDxL...

Steven Spielberg's "Obama" - 2013 Correspondents' Dinner Comedy Video

9/11 Moments, Kevin Spacey sings John Lennon, Mind Games




WHILE I'M DEEPLY HONORED TO BE
HERE TONIGHT, I'M ALSO
INCREDIBLY PISSED OFF.
I'M OUTRAGED BECAUSE JOHN,
THIS PASSIONATE PROPHET
OF PEACE, IS NOT HERE
BECAUSE WE LIVE IN A TOO VIOLENT
WORLD.
AND SO, IN THE SPIRIT OF THIS
OCCASION, IT'S UP TO ALL OF US
TO KEEP HIS SONGS ALIVE.
BUT ALSO HELP REBUILD NEW YORK,
AND THAT INCLUDES YOUR HOST.

Make The Unmakeable Challenge #1 - GrabCAD Share it with your friends! grand and ultimate prize, which will be announced in September 2015: the ultimate Make the Unmakeable champion will win a (uPrint SE 3D printer by Stratasys) from FATHOM (value $15,900);

Make The Unmakeable Challenge #1 - GrabCAD



Make The Unmakeable Challenge #1

Medium
FATHOM is challenging all designers and engineers to think differently about how they design and manufacture products today by leveraging the unlimited design freedom made possible through additive manufacturing. From prototypes to production, the winning submission selected by a panel of judges in FATHOM’s Make the Unmakeable Challenges of 2015 will demonstrate an original way 3D printing can enhance the product development process.
Throughout 2015, FATHOM will be holding three different challenges, all hosted through GrabCAD. In addition to scoring great prizes, the winning design of each of the three Challenges will be judged for a grand prize. In September of 2015, the ultimate Make the Unmakeable champion will win a professional 3D printer from FATHOM.
CHALLENGE #1: CREATIVE SOLUTIONS FOR NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS
www.studiofathom.com


Teen Builds Threat-Evading Flying Robot Inspired by … Fruit Flies | Cogito.org "He started thinking he might actually learn something from their quick getaways."

Teen Builds Threat-Evading Flying Robot Inspired by … Fruit Flies | Cogito.org



“There were banana peels on our counter that we hadn’t thrown away, and there were fruit flies everywhere,” said Mihir, who is starting tenth grade this year. “We kept trying to swat at them but they kept getting away.”
He was struck by the fact that these tiny flies could repeatedly escape their determined swats. But Mihir, who has been taking apart phones and computers and putting them back together since he was 7 or 8 years old, wasn’t content just to marvel at these winged Houdinis."
He started thinking he might actually learn something from their quick getaways.

eTalks - The Secrets of Food Marketing

upcoming IBM webinar, “Changing the Learning Culture,” where Blue Focus Marketing cofounder Mark Burgess and I will join Scott Edwards, Product Manager, Smarter Workforce, for a discussion of social employees—focusing on the best training models and strategies for establishing an engaged, sustainable culture. Join us on Tuesday, March 24, at 11 a.m. EST! Register Now: IBM Webcast: Changing the Learning Culture

LeadersBubbleBlog-625x300

Leaders Will Bubble Up Through Social Learning

BY CHERYL BURGESS

We are excited to be participating in the upcoming IBM webinar, “Changing the Learning Culture,” where Blue Focus Marketing cofounder Mark Burgess and I will join Scott Edwards, Product Manager, Smarter Workforce, for a discussion of social employees—focusing on the best training models and strategies for establishing an engaged, sustainable culture. Join us on Tuesday, March 24, at 11 a.m. EST!

It’s been said that social business is all about democratization—about empowering a workforce of social employees to act as nimble, self-sufficient brand ambassadors who have the skills, training and moxie to make in-the-moment decisions when the situation calls for it. But if that’s true, some have asked, then what role does leadership have in an era where the command-and-control model of business is quickly being supplanted?
In our book The Social Employee (McGraw-Hill, 2013), Blue Focus Marketing cofounder Mark Burgess and I argue that social leadership—especially within the C-Suite—is essential for a variety of reasons. Perhaps chief among them is the concept of transparency and visibility: If you’re not adopting and modeling the social processes you want established within your workforce, why should you expect your employees to?
This is where the importance of social leadership begins. But of course, leadership in any era is about providing a vision of where business is headed and guiding your organization in that general direction. Right now, that direction is social, an organizing structure in which employees are far more likely to buy in to new processes when they have a model to follow—and perhaps learn alongside.
How important is it? We’ll let these numbers from a 2014 BRANDFog study (which surveyed over a thousand U.S.- and U.K.-based employees) do the talking:
  • 83 percent of those surveyed said CEOs active in social media are better at building relationships with customers, employees and investors.
  • 75 felt that executive social engagement fosters better overall leadership.
  • 82 percent agreed that CEO engagement produces industry leadership, and 77 percent agreed that leadership enhances credibility among both internal and external stakeholders.
Social leadership doesn’t just boost your credibility within an organization, but also in the public sphere. And remember, better public credibility generally means higher-quality job applicants. But while the BRANDFog numbers are interesting, their focus in the study was limited to CEO leadership, or what we call a social executive. Social executives are indeed social leaders, but social leaders also exist within all levels of an organization, and they are incredibly important to building a sustainable organizational culture. Here’s how Josh Bersin (@Josh_Bersin), in his “Predictions for 2015” report, sees it:
Hold leaders accountable for more than just performance—they are responsible for employee engagement, employee development, and developing their own successors. As we discuss throughout this report, in 2015, we will all operate in a highly competitive world for talent, so leaders must be incented to develop and retain their people. Otherwise, the organization as a whole will suffer. (p. 43)
Social leadership isn’t about personal glory. Rather, it’s about establishing a level of quality and expectations to which future employees will aspire. It’s about building brand eminence in the presence while simultaneously laying a foundation for the future.
But how do you do it?
Put a premium on education and training. Build an organizational culture that doesn’t just learn, but that values learning.
And do it in a way that empowers employees to learn on their own. At IBM, Scott Edwards is a champion of the 70:20:10 learning model, which works something like this: Employee learning is 70 percent self-directed, 20 percent mentoring and coaching and 10 percent formal training. Now, if we know that over two-thirds of all employee learning is done independently, then formal training efforts must be built around the idea of employee empowerment, providing them with the tools and critical thinking skills to ask the right questions and to seek the answers in the right places. More than that, organizations have a responsibility to build a resource infrastructure that supports self-directed learning.
And here’s the great thing about a social learning culture: When somebody discovers a bit of valuable knowledge, they’re going to want to share it. These are your leaders in the making, bubbling up to the surface through the process of social learning and eager to spread the word. So whatever platform you provide to help them share—be it a blog, an employee work group or an internal messaging channel—just make sure that others can access this valuable resource. This will enable others in the organization to address similar needs more efficiently—and through a trusted internal channel.
From there, the knowledge base of your organization can only grow—raising the bar of what your employees can accomplish and establishing your brand eminence within the industry.
Sounds like a win-win to me.

Cheryl Burgess

CHERYL BURGESS

Cheryl Burgess Co-founder, Chief Executive and Chief Marketing Officer Blue Focus Marketing® Cheryl helps clients transform their brands from the inside out by implementing strategic social b ...(Read More)
Posted in: FeaturedLearningSocial