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David Bowie - Heroes (live) I'm rocking out today, Happy Labor day Weekend! Love DD Vasseur

CA Passes First State Bag Ban - "This needs to be" DD Vasseur

Everyone,
Legislators in California sent a clear message to the plastics industry just before midnight yesterday, when the State Senate passed SB 270 with a 22-15 vote to ban single-use plastic grocery bags.

We've overcome fierce lobbying by single-use bag manufacturers--intensified in the last few months of session--to reach this historic moment.

The bill now advances to the Governor’s desk for a signature. Please urge him to sign the bill into law! Governor Brown has until the end of September 30th to take action.

The State Legislature spent a great deal of time debating the merits of this issue over the last several months, and especially this week. In the end, it was the reports of overwhelming success of this policy at the local level that overcame the political attacks and misinformation from out-of-state plastic bag makers. At least124 cities or counties in the state have an adopted local bag ordinance.

The California State Legislature is the first in the nation to approve a plastic bag ban. We are elated over this history-making win after a decade-long fight over the issue. But we couldn't have done it without you there, every step of the way throughout the years.

We can't thank you enough for your unwavering dedication and support. We did it!!! Now let's make sure Governor Brown finishes the job.

Sincerely,

Mark Murray
Executive Director, Californians Against Waste

The Black Eyed Peas - Where Is The Love? This song is what's my heart, every day!

Neil Diamond - BBC Concert 1971 - FULL VERSION Happy Labor Day to all my friends, Bless you all!

Who actually creates jobs: Start-ups, small businesses or big corporations? - The Washington Post

Who actually creates jobs: Start-ups, small businesses or big corporations? - The Washington Post

The Ultimate In SELF-SUSTAINABILITY | Polk County Itemizer-Observer

The Ultimate In SELF-SUSTAINABILITY | Polk County Itemizer-Observer

Khan Academy You only have to know one thing: You can Learn Anything For Free. For Everyone. Forever. How Wonderful!

Khan Academy



You can learn anything

How Feminism Beat Facebook (And What The Campaign Might Mean For Online Equality) - Forbes

How Feminism Beat Facebook (And What The Campaign Might Mean For Online Equality) - Forbes







A short, sharp, and unbending campaign by a group of feminist organizers led to a major change in Facebook ‘s posting policy, effectively banning hate speech against women.
Just a week after Women, Action & the Media, the Everyday Sexism Project and activist Soraya Chemaly swung into digital action, demanding that the world’s largest social network “take concrete, effective action to end gender-based hate speech on its site,” Facebook caved.
The social network reacted to an online onslaught aimed at its advertisers – 60,000 tweets using the #FBrape tag and thousands of emails (and more importantly, an “instant” network that grew to more than 100 social justice organizations) calling attention to the rampant sexism and violence toward that sometimes pervades Facebook’s vast reaches. What was fascinating about the campaign – at least to me – wasn’t its size, but its intensity. It wasn’t so much the tweet counts, likes, and number of emails sent that mattered – it was the cohesive message that WAM! and its partners presented, backed up by the Web’s most potent ad hoc coalition: feminist organizers and organizations. The power of that coalition has been on full display over the last year – from the reaction to Susan G. Komen Foundation’s defunding of Planned Parenthood and the boycott of radio host Rush Limbaughbecause of gross sexist remarks, to organizing in the wake of the shooting of heroic Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafza, networked feminism is clearly a force.
And what was interesting about the Facebook campaign against violent speech and images directed at women....READ MORE!

The Environmental Advantages of Cities | The MIT Press

The Environmental Advantages of Cities | The MIT Press



The Environmental Advantages of Cities

Countering Commonsense Antiurbanism

Overview

Conventional wisdom about the environmental impact of cities holds that urbanization and environmental quality are necessarily at odds. Cities are seen to be sites of ecological disruption, consuming a disproportionate share of natural resources, producing high levels of pollution, and concentrating harmful emissions precisely where the population is most concentrated. Cities appear to be particularly vulnerable to natural disasters, to be inherently at risk from outbreaks of infectious diseases, and even to offer dysfunctional and unnatural settings for human life. In this book, William Meyer tests these widely held beliefs against the evidence.

Borrowing some useful terminology from the public health literature, Meyer weighs instances of “urban penalty” against those of “urban advantage.” He finds that many supposed urban environmental penalties are illusory, based on commonsense preconceptions and not on solid evidence. In fact, greater degrees of “urbanness” often offer advantages rather than penalties. The characteristic compactness of cities, for example, lessens the pressure on ecological systems and enables resource consumption to be more efficient. On the whole, Meyer reports, cities offer greater safety from environmental hazards (geophysical, technological, and biological) than more dispersed settlement does. In fact, the city-defining characteristics widely supposed to result in environmental penalties do much to account for cities’ environmental advantages.

As of 2008 (according to U.N. statistics), more people live in cities than in rural areas. Meyer’s analysis clarifies the effects of such a profound shift, covering a full range of environmental issues in urban settings.

About the Author

William B. Meyer is Associate Professor of Geography at Colgate University. He is the author ofAmericans and Their Weather: A History and Human Impact on the Earth.

Endorsements

“William Meyer concisely and engagingly demolishes the persistent popular misconception that cities are bad for people and the environment. Adjusting for wealth and population density, he shows that the town beats the country on almost all indicators of environment and pollution, resource consumption, and human health and well-being. This is a must-read for friends and foes of the city alike.”
Steve Rayner, James Martin Professor and Director of the Program for the Future of Cities, Oxford University"—
“William Meyer has amassed an impressive critique of the commonsense notion of an urban penalty. He marshals this considerable evidence into a persuasive argument that exposes the fallacies in the popular view and showcases the efficiencies and environmental benefits offered by city living. This work is vitally important reading for those interested in the future of urban life.”
Craig E. Colten, Carl O. Sauer Professor, Department of Geography and Anthropology, Louisiana State University"—
“This book is a significant contribution to the field of urban studies. It will be valuable for researchers in many diverse fields, including planning, geography, sociology, and history. It will also be a book that policy makers should read because it dismantles a number of the arguments that are being used to slow the movement of people to cities.”
Timothy Crimmins, Director of the Center for Neighborhood and Metropolitan Studies, Georgia State University"—

Urban and Industrial Environments | The MIT Press

Urban and Industrial Environments | The MIT Press



Lessons from China
The development and deployment of cleaner energy technologies have become globalized phenomena. Yet despite the fact that energy-related goods account for more than ten percent of international trade, policy makers, academics, and the business community perceive barriers to the global diffusion of these emerging technologies. Experts point to problems including intellectual property concerns, trade barriers, and developing countries’ limited access to technology and funding.

The Informal American City Beyond Taco Trucks and Day Labor - Urban and Industrial Environments | The MIT Press - “informal revolution" in American urban life, exploring a proliferating phenomenon often associated with developing countries rather than industrialized ones and often dismissed by planners and policy makers as marginal or even criminal.

Urban and Industrial Environments | The MIT Press



Beyond Taco Trucks and Day Labor
Every day in American cities street vendors spread out their wares on sidewalks, food trucks serve lunch from the curb, and homeowners hold sales in their front yards—examples of the wide range of informal activities that take place largely beyond the reach of government regulation. This book examines the “informal revolution" in American urban life, exploring a proliferating phenomenon often associated with developing countries rather than industrialized ones and often dismissed by planners and policy makers as marginal or even criminal.

Rail and the City Shrinking Our Carbon Footprint While Reimagining - Urban and Industrial Environments | The MIT Press

Urban and Industrial Environments | The MIT Press


Urban and Industrial Environments

Shrinking Our Carbon Footprint While Reimagining 
Urban Space
The United States has evolved into a nation of twenty 
densely populated megaregions. Yet despite the environmental 
advantages of urban density, urban sprawl and reliance on 
the private car still set the pattern for most new development. 
Cars guzzle not only gas but also space, as massive acreage is 
dedicated to roadways and parking. Even more pressing, the 
replication of this pattern throughout the fast-developing 
world makes it doubtful that we will achieve the reductions 
in carbon emissions needed to avoid climate catastrophe.

Localist Movements in a Global Economy | The MIT Press

Localist Movements in a Global Economy | The MIT Press



Localist Movements in a Global Economy

Sustainability, Justice, and Urban Development in the United States

Overview

The internationalization of economies and other changes that accompany globalization have brought about a paradoxical reemergence of the local. A significant but largely unstudied aspect of new local-global relationships is the growth of “localist movements,” efforts to reclaim economic and political sovereignty for metropolitan and other subnational regions. In Localist Movements in a Global Economy, David Hess offers an overview of localism in the United States and assesses its potential to address pressing global problems of social justice and environmental sustainability. Since the 1990s, more than 100 local business organizations have formed in the United States, and there are growing efforts to build local ownership in the retail, food, energy, transportation, and media industries. In this first social science study of localism, Hess adopts an interdisciplinary approach that combines theoretical reflection, empirical research, and policy analysis. His perspective is not that of the uncritical localist advocate; he draws on his new empirical research to assess the extent to which localist policies can address sustainability and justice issues. After a theoretical discussion of sustainability, the global corporate economy, and economic development, Hess looks at four specific forms of localism: “buy local” campaigns; urban agriculture; local ownership of electricity and transportation; and alternative and community media. Hess examines “global localism”--transnational local-to-local supply chains--and other economic policies and financial instruments that would create an alternative economic structure. Localism is not a panacea for globalization, he concludes, but a crucial ingredient in projects to build more democratic, just, and sustainable politics.

About the Author

David J. Hess is Professor of Sociology at Vanderbilt University. He is the author of Alternative Pathways in Science and Industry: Activism, Innovation, and the Environment in an Era of Globalization (MIT Press, 2007) and Localist Movements in a Global Economy: Sustainability, Justice, and Urban Development in the United States (MIT Press, 2009), and many other books.

Endorsements

“A clear-eyed and intensively researched analysis of the ways in which localism does or does not promote a more sustainable and just world. Analyses of localism have been generally split between romantic advocates and cynical critics, but very few researchers have stepped back and carried out the kind of careful and objective analysis of the claims and the critiques of localism that David Hess has done here. This book provides the most in-depth grappling of this issue to date. The case studies bring the book to life and will engage a wide variety of readers at a wide range of interest and understanding.” --E. Melanie DuPuis, Department of Sociology, University of California, Santa Cruz"—

News – PACENow - Lean & Green’s first project keeps PACE with national trends (Wow, all I can say is Bravo! DD)

News – PACENow



"Solar financing program PACE is back, but feds are still wary.

Posted: Tuesday, August 26, 2014 4:51 pm
Monterey County recently announced the launch of the CaliforniaFIRST residential PACE (Property Assessed Clean Energy) program, which allows homeowners to finance energy-efficient home improvements through private loans paid off as line items on their property tax bills. The Board of Supervisors heard an update on the program July 29.
Advocates say the program could provide easier access to funding for home efficiency upgrades, particularly solar panels. Regulators, however, remain concerned the lending practices are not strict enough, and that the loans could cause problems for borrowers and mortgage lenders.
Monterey County first approved participation in the program in 2010. But shortly after approval, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (the agency that oversees mortgage securitzers Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac) issued a statement effectively halting the program. Read more."

Lean & Green’s first project keeps PACE with national trends

"Ari Kresch, CEO of 1-800-LAW-FIRM, likes to brag that his Southfield company is the first in the country to use its phone number as its actual name.
Perhaps more significantly, though, he may be the first attorney in the country to use an innovative, new financing mechanism called PACE, which stands for property assessed clean energy, to make major, money-saving, clean-energy upgrades to his building.
The roof of Kresch’s 1-800-LAW-FIRM building, near the busy intersection of I-696 and the Lodge Freeway, is now covered with brand-new solar panels. Four small wind turbines are on their way, and his parking lot will soon boast a solarized carport and electric-vehicle charging stations along with newly installed high-efficiency lighting.
Yet Kresch did not front a dime of his own money on the $540,000 project, managed by Novi-based solar installer Srinergy, and likely never will: His financing is so favorable that when the panels and turbines finally spark up and cut his monthly $6,000 electric bills in half, those savings will more than cover his loan payments."

In search of libertarians BY JOCELYN KILEY! "I am definitely a Libertarian" - DD Vasseur LEAN Government is important to me!

AUGUST 25, 2014

In search of libertarians

FT_who-is-libertarianThe question of whether libertarianism is gaining public support has received increased attention, with talk of aRand Paul run for president and a recent New York Times magazine story asking if the “Libertarian Moment” has finally arrived. But if it has, there are still many Americans who do not have a clear sense of what “libertarian” means, and our surveys find that, on many issues, the views among people who call themselves libertarian do not differ much from those of the overall public.
About one-in-ten Americans (11%) describe themselves as libertarian and know what the term means. Respondents were asked whether the term “libertarian” describes them well and — in a separate multiple-choice question — asked for the definition of “someone whose political views emphasize individual freedom by limiting the role of government”; 57% correctly answered the multiple-choice question, choosing “libertarian” from a list that included “progressive,” “authoritarian,” “Unitarian” and “communist.” On the self-description question 14% said they were libertarian. For the purpose of this analysis we focus on the 11% who both say they are libertarian and know the definition of the term.
These findings come from the Pew Research Center’s political typology and polarization survey conducted earlier this year, as well as a recent survey of a subset of those respondents via the Pew Research Center’s new American Trends Panel, conducted April 29-May 27 among 3,243 adults.
Self-described libertarians tend to be modestly more supportive of some libertarian positions, but few of them hold consistent libertarian opinions on the role of government, foreign policy and social issues.
Men were about twice as likely as women to say the term libertarian describes them well and to know the meaning of the term (15% vs. 7%). More college graduates (15%) than those with no more than a high school education (7%) identified as libertarians. There also were partisan differences; 14% of independents and 12% of Republicans said they are libertarian, compared with 6% of Democrats.
Some of these differences arise from confusion about the meaning of “libertarian.” Just 42% of those with a high school education or less answered the multiple-choice question correctly, compared with 76% of college graduates.
FT_libertarian-government-aidIn some cases, the political views of self-described libertarians differ modestly from those of the general public; in others there are no differences at all.
When it comes to attitudes about the size and scope of government, people who say the term libertarian describes them well (and who are able to correctly define the term) are somewhat more likely than the public overall to say government regulation of business does more harm than good (56% vs. 47%). However, about four-in-ten libertarians say that government regulation of business is necessary to protect the public interest (41%).
The attitudes of libertarians similarly differ from the public on government aid to the poor; they are more likely than the public to say “government aid to the poor does more harm than good by making people too dependent on government assistance” (57% vs. 48%), yet about four-in-ten (38%) say it “does more good than harm because people can’t get out of poverty until their basic needs are met.”
FT_libertarian-marijuanaLibertarianism is associated with limited government involvement in the social sphere. In this regard, self-described libertarians are somewhat more supportive of legalizing marijuana than the public overall (65% vs. 54%).
But there are only slight differences between libertarians and the public in views of the acceptability of homosexuality. And they are about as likely as others to favor allowing the police “to stop and search anyone who fits the general description of a crime suspect” (42% of libertarians, 41% of the public).
Libertarians, U.S. Role in World AffairsSimilarly, self-described libertarians do not differ a great deal from the public in opinions about foreign policy. Libertarianism is generally associated with a less activist foreign policy, yet a greater share of self-described libertarians (43%) than the public (35%) think “it is best for the future of our country to be active in world affairs.”
And in views of the tradeoff between defending against terrorism and protecting civil liberties, large majorities of both the public (74%) and self-described libertarians (82%) say “Americans shouldn’t have to give up privacy and freedom in order to be safe from terrorism.” READ MORE!