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Brain Drain - Report: Exodus of young adults worst in Westchester's wealthiest towns | Regional Plan Association

Report: Exodus of young adults worst in Westchester's wealthiest towns | Regional Plan Association



Report: Exodus of young adults worst in Westchester's wealthiest towns



Christopher Jones, vice president for research at the the Regional Plan Association, an urban planning organization based in New York City, reviewed the report and said it is a very strong indication that places without much rental or affordable housing have had a harder time holding or attracting young people. “For us, it really confirms what the impact of restrictive zoning has been,” he said. Read the full article.

Brain Drain - CT's Lack of affordable housing, combined with student loans is driving Connecticut's Educated STEM Workforce out of state. I will lose my second young adult child to Massachusetts, soon.  I know more kids that have moved out of state than I do still living here.  CT's an aging state. I wonder who will be paying taxes and paying to repair and maintain our costly aged infra structure.  

10 Ways To Make The Most Of Every Day

10 Ways To Make The Most Of Every Day



TECH  39,739 views

How Sleep Deprivation Drives The High Failure Rates of Tech Startups

I work in my sleep now. I fall asleep most nights writing and rewriting opening lines and first paragraphs in my head. And every morning before I wake, I am somehow still writing sentences in my head, twisted into my sheets while comparing arguments and searching for counter-arguments that could undo a whole story. This is probably not a good habit to be in, but taking work along to bed has become commonplace in the age of the self-funded permalance entrepreneur. A 2008 survey found 51% of small business employees saying they work in their sleep, and of those close to 70% try and apply the things they’ve dreamt about to their jobs the following day.
This obsessive interest in getting things done at all times has become a hallmark of the tech industry, with Marissa Mayer admitting to 130 hour work weeks at Google and sleeping under her desk. Twitter and Square co-founder Jack Dorsey claims to work 16-hour days while sleeping only four hours a night. It isn’t enough to be a worker in today’s economy, accepting eight hours of daily labor as a compromise with the greater good. There is no greater good, only the perpetual sifting of branded widgets and magical products on the verge of being announced. The future always seems to hold more than the past on the Internet, and so there is always one new potential sale incoming, one transformative piece of information waiting to be found, one last edit to make. Sleep only postpones the future and all the productivity it could hold.
6190837806_62f4d8de43_b
An intern catches some zzz’s (Photo credit: Richard Elzey)
The irony of this increase in working hours is that it usually comes in service of extraordinarily bad ideas, the majority of which end in failure....READ MORE

How Sleep Deprivation Drives The High Failure Rates of Tech Startups

How Sleep Deprivation Drives The High Failure Rates of Tech Startups




TECH  39,739 views

How Sleep Deprivation Drives The High Failure Rates of Tech Startups


I work in my sleep now. I fall asleep most nights writing and rewriting opening lines and first paragraphs in my head. And every morning before I wake, I am somehow still writing sentences in my head, twisted into my sheets while comparing arguments and searching for counter-arguments that could undo a whole story. This is probably not a good habit to be in, but taking work along to bed has become commonplace in the age of the self-funded permalance entrepreneur. A 2008 survey found 51% of small business employees saying they work in their sleep, and of those close to 70% try and apply the things they’ve dreamt about to their jobs the following day.
This obsessive interest in getting things done at all times has become a hallmark of the tech industry, with Marissa Mayer admitting to 130 hour work weeks at Google and sleeping under her desk. Twitter and Square co-founder Jack Dorsey claims to work 16-hour days while sleeping only four hours a night. It isn’t enough to be a worker in today’s economy, accepting eight hours of daily labor as a compromise with the greater good. There is no greater good, only the perpetual sifting of branded widgets and magical products on the verge of being announced. The future always seems to hold more than the past on the Internet, and so there is always one new potential sale incoming, one transformative piece of information waiting to be found, one last edit to make. Sleep only postpones the future and all the productivity it could hold.
6190837806_62f4d8de43_b
An intern catches some zzz’s (Photo credit: Richard Elzey)
The irony of this increase in working hours is that it usually comes in service of extraordinarily bad ideas, the majority of which end in failure. READ MORE

Thank Goodness We Have Walmart If American Shoppers Are This Poor

Thank Goodness We Have Walmart If American Shoppers Are This Poor

Congress, Fearing 'Brain Drain,' Seeks to Opt Out of Participating in Obamacare's Exchanges - Forbes

Congress, Fearing 'Brain Drain,' Seeks to Opt Out of Participating in Obamacare's Exchanges - Forbes

Congress, Fearing 'Brain Drain,' Seeks to Opt Out of Participating in Obamacare's Exchanges - Forbes



I'm sure the tax payers will be the losers we always are... I think it would be nice if the wonks went to work in the private sector. They could experience first hand the fruits of their labor...


Congress, Fearing 'Brain Drain,' Seeks to Opt Out of Participating in Obamacare's Exchanges


English: Official photo of United States Senat...
Sen. Chuck Grassley (R., Iowa) authored the Obamacare amendment requiring that members of Congress and their staff participate in the law's insurance exchanges. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

"Sen. Grassley’s original idea was to require all federal employees to enroll in the exchanges, instead of in the Federal Employee Health Benefits Program, where most gain coverage today. Indeed, a previous Senate Finance Committee amendment proposed putting members and staffers on Medicaid. But “fierce opposition from federal employee unions” sank Grassley’s effort, and he had to water his amendment down to only apply to Congress and congressional staff.
Staffers grumble about being stuck on the exchanges
Ever since Obamacare became law, this has been a source of grumbling among the congressional staffers I talk to. One aspect of the Grassley amendment is that it originally appeared to exempt staffers who worked for congressional committees, and congressional leadership, because those staffers didn’t work for specific Members of Congress. (My understanding is that the Office of PersonnelManagement has since clarified the regulations to include all staff, including committee and leadership.)
There are a couple of legitimate issues for Congress to resolve with this provision, formally known as Section 1312(d)(3)(D) of the Affordable Care Act. First: Will staffers have to buy insurance on the exchanges for themselves with after-tax money, or will the government be able to contribute to these costs with a pre-tax contribution? Second: In the past, the government’s sponsorship of health benefits for members and staffers counted toward retiree benefits. If these individuals are placed on the exchange, will their pensions will be affected?
According to the Congressional Research Service, Congress’ in-house think tank, the government can indeed contribute to members’ and staffers’ premium costs. “While it does not appear that the contribution must be similar to the contribution provided under FEHBP,” CRS writes in a 2010 report, “it seems the section may provide the authority for the federal government to make a contribution to the health insurance premiums of Members of Congress and congressional staff. Under FEHBP…the government’s share of premiums is set at 72% of the weighted average premium of all plans in the program, not to exceed 75% of any given plan’s premium.”
So Congress should have the authority to fund a comparable portion of the premiums as they do today. Staffers are waiting for a ruling from the Office of Personnel Management on precisely this point."
A bipartisan deal to rescind the provision?

Scammer, Awaiting Sentence, Rebuilds | New Haven Independent "megalandlord named

Scammer, Awaiting Sentence, Rebuilds | New Haven Independent



Scammer, Awaiting Sentence, Rebuilds

BY Paul Bass | MAR 27, 2014 3:17 PM
(4) Comments | Post a Comment | E-mail the Author

Posted to: HousingLegal WritesNewhallville

"The confessed mastermind of a massive mortgage-fraud ring has started amassing a new

poverty real-estate empire—before he even goes to prison.

 "buying dozens of often destroyed homes in areas like Newhallville and the Hill, in some cases with money from out of state and abroad. The neighborhoods have been ravaged by white-collar crimes like"
These are just snippets read more

Land Banking: Turning Around Urban Decay | Regional Plan Association

Land Banking: Turning Around Urban Decay | Regional Plan Association

RPA's Assembly




Land Banking: Turning Around Urban Decay

Empire State Future is a statewide coalition that includes RPA that encourages smart growth to revitalize New York's town centers and urban areas.
Abandoned houses and vacant properties blight New York's urban landscape, from Schenectady, Syracuse, and Troy in upstate New York, to Brookhaven, Beacon, and Newburgh outside New York City. Cross state lines and you can find plenty of empty homes or vacant land in and around Patterson, NJ, or Bridgeport, CT.
Vacant and abandoned properties present myriad problems for any city. They signal disinvestment and disrepair to neighbors and passers-by — telling people that it's OK to litter in front of them, scrawl graffiti on their walls, or use them as drug havens — leading to a spiral of decay that gradually claims whole neighborhoods. Although this problem is worse in the economically depressed areas in upstate New York, it also exists in and around the more prosperous Tri-state region.
While cities address these challenges in many useful ways such as code enforcement, one underused tool is Land Banking.
A Land Bank is not a literal bank, but an organization, either public or non-profit, whose sole mission is to acquire property, clear titles, and dispose of land so the parcels again generate tax revenue.
This contrasts with the traditional approach of City Hall, which is to foreclose on property, where property can languish in limbo for decades. The Philadelphia branch of the Federal Reserve has published a good primer on what a land bank is that can be found here.
Land banks have been gaining popularity in the past decade, particularly in Rust Belt states such as Michigan and Ohio. The best national example is the Genesee County Land Bank in Flint, Mich., a city of 102,000 people, down from 190,000 in 1960. This organization, formed in 2002, has developed innovative programs to facilitate the reuse of more than 4,000 formerly vacant and abandoned properties including side-lot transfer (more than 200 parcels), community gardens, housing rehabilitation, and foreclosure avoidance (serving more than 1,300 families). Since its inception, this land bank has helped real property values in Flint to increase by more than $100 million.
These land banks can help solve the many problems that urban abandonment poses . Research in Philadelphia has demonstrated that the presence of a single vacant or abandoned property on a block decreases surrounding home values by an average of $6,720. More abandonment means even greater home value loss.
When properties become a threat to public health and safety, municipalities must step up and bear the costs. Cost estimates from around New York State for demolitions of residential single-family and small multifamily structures range from $15,000 to $25,000 per structure.
Short of demolition as a last resort, the cost of boarding up broken windows, clearing sidewalks and removing trash also add up for municipalities. These properties are a further drain on already weak urban finances.
In the wake of the mortgage and foreclosure crisis, we may be seeing more urban abandonment in the Tri-state region. Many first-ring suburbs, from Western New York to Long Island, now face rising vacancy rates after the collapse of housing booms.
Could land banks work for other Northeastern states? Many experts from across the country think so. In New York, they have worked closely with Assemblyman Sam Hoyt, D-Buffalo, to draft a piece of legislation (A. 373, S. 663) now under consideration. This legislation would give cities, counties or towns the option to create an entity with proven tools to deal with vacant and abandoned properties.
If titles can be cleared and back taxes forgiven, abandoned properties will start to make their way back into the market. Properties can be held and combined into larger tracts to make development more attractive for investors. Giving more control to local governments means that strategies can be tailored to meet the needs of communities with different conditions, needs and goals." READ MORE

- NPR/PBS’s Hinojosa Envisions New Haven’s Mañana - New Haven Independent — Arts

New Haven Independent — Arts



NPR/PBS’s Hinojosa Envisions New Haven’s Mañana

BY Lucy Gellman | MAR 28, 2014 8:58 AM | COMMENTS (2)
Maria Hinojosa had a problem: CNN wanted her to use a word that just didn’t feel
Lucy Gellman Photo
LUCY GELLMAN PHOTO
 right: Illegal. Not right on the tip of the tongue, not right when it swirled around in the gut. So she sought advice from a man “who couldn’t be more unlike me:” Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel, winner of the 1986 Nobel Peace Prize. 



Textile-Platform - News&Events - TEPPIES call and brokerage event

Textile-Platform - News&Events - TEPPIES call and brokerage event



TEPPIES Call And Brokerage Event

Successful event with 110 participants in total, from 20 countries. Presentations are available for Textile ETP members in the internal document library.
Following the first calls of the HORIZON 2020 Programme, the Textile ETP has launched a call of its TEPPIES scheme, which supports companies and researchers to develop good project proposals and build strong European project consortia. Deadline for submission of project ideas was 15 January 2014.
On 23-24 January 2014 a brokerage event will take place in Brussels during which project ideas can be presented and EC officials will explain the details of 2014 HORIZON 2020 call topics most relevant for textile-related research.
These include (but are not limited to):
    ·         NMP-04-2014: High-definition printing of multifunctional materials
    ·         NMP-18-2014: Materials solutions for use in the creative industry sector
    ·         BIOTEC-3-2014: Widening industrial application of enzymatic processes
    ·         WATER-1a-2014: First application and market replication
    ·         WASTE-1-2014: Moving towards a circular economy through industrial symbiosis
    ·         EeB-02-2014: Adaptable envelopes integrated in building refurbishment projects
      ·         ICT-03-2014: Advanced Thin, Organic and Large Area Electronics (TOLAE) technologies
      ·         NMP-35-2014: Business models with new supply chains for sustainable customer-driven small series production
      ·         ICT-18-2014: Support the growth of ICT innovative Creative Industries SMEs
      Download here the final event agenda.
      « 9TH ANNUAL PUBLIC CONFERENCE - EFFECTIVE TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FROM RESEARCH TO INDUSTRY - CLOSE TO 160 PARTICIPANTS - REGISTRATIONS ARE CLOSED | MAIN | SAVE THE DATE - 9TH ANNUAL ETP CONFERENCE TAKES PLACE ON 31 MARCH -1 APRIL 2014 IN BRUSSELS »

      Tassoglas » A very interesting green business. Tassoglas is a Johns Manville brand. Johns Manville is a leading manufacturer and marketer of premium-quality products for building insulation, mechanical insulation, commercial roofing, and roof insulation, as well as fibers and nonwovens for commercial, industrial and residential applications. "I have always found this area of efficiency to be quite fascinating, Imagine clear coatings that preserve, abate, insulate and protect on a nano level older surfaces of buildings. I'm excited about learning more. DD Vasseur

      Tassoglas » About Them

      jm
      Tassoglas is a Johns Manville brand. Johns Manville is a leading manufacturer and marketer of premium-quality products for building insulation, mechanical insulation, commercial roofing, and roof insulation, as well as fibers and nonwovens for commercial, industrial and residential applications.
      JM serves markets that include aerospace, automotive and transportation, air handling, appliance, HVAC, pipe and equipment, filtration, waterproofing, building, flooring, interiors and wind energy.  In business since 1858, the Denver-based company has annual sales of approximately $2.5 billion and holds leadership positions in all of the key markets that it serves.
      JM employs approximately 7,000 people and operates 45 manufacturing facilities in North America, Europe and China.

      New NYU/Yale Study: Rooftop Solar is Contagious - Center for Business and the Environment at Yale - News

      Center for Business and the Environment at Yale - News

      By Yoni Cohen - Follow Yoni on twitter @Cohen_Yoni
      There goes the neighborhood. A new study by NYU and Yale professors suggests that rooftop solar is contagious. You are more likely to install solar panels on your roof if your neighbors have gone solar.
      In “Peer Effects in the Diffusion of Solar Photovoltaic Panels,” Bryan Bollinger of the NYU Stern School of Business and Kenneth Gillingham of the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies analyzed residential solar installations in California from January 2001 to August 2011.

      Proof Positive That Energy Efficiency Is The "Sweet Spot" For Congress And For Our Country

      MEDIA RELEASE

      Proof Positive That Energy Efficiency Is The "Sweet Spot" For Congress And For Our Country

      Release Date: Wednesday, March 5, 2014
      A Statement From Alliance to Save Energy President Kateri Callahan
      Legislators from both sides of the aisle and both ends of the political spectrum agree on one thing:  policies that advance energy efficiency in the U.S. are good for our economy, good for consumers and businesses, and good for our environment. The proof? Today the House of Representatives – which has been grid-locked on energy and climate issues – passed an energy efficiency bill with well over two thirds voting in favor. 
      Two visionary members of the House Energy and Commerce Committee Alliance Honorary Vice Chair Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.) and Rep. David McKinley (R-W.Va.) championed the legislation (H.R. 2126) that is estimated by 2030 to yield roughly $640 million in annual energy savings as well as the creation of new jobs and significant reductions of greenhouse gas emissions. Importantly, these national benefits will be realized with little cost to taxpayers and no government mandates.
      How can so much be achieved with this legislation? Energy efficiency is the cheapest, cleanest and most abundant national resource. And, the more our national leaders find ways to tap into this important resource, the more energy productive our economy will become. And, when we are move energy productive we are creating jobs and reducing emissions associated with energy production and use.
      The Energy Efficiency Improvement Act delivers these important benefits to America by reducing energy use from the built environment, which is the largest consuming energy sector in our economy; encouraging energy efficiency practices in leased spaces; promoting energy efficiency in federal data centers; allowing the use of grid-enabled water heaters for demand response programs; and, spurring the benchmarking of energy usage in commercial buildings.
      The Alliance believes that passage of this bipartisan bill will mark the beginning of a new era of bi-partisan cooperation on energy efficiency policies that will strengthen the U.S. economy, create jobs, enhance our environment and increase our energy security.
      The Blog to Save Energy​ has more