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Ask the Experts: Your weather questions answered - USATODAY.com

Ask the Experts: Your weather questions answered - USATODAY.com


Q: Was the lowest barometric pressure in U.S. history recorded during a hurricane?

Yes. The lowest barometric pressure ever measured on the U.S. mainland was 26.35 inches, set on Sept. 2, 1935, in Long Key, Fla., during the Category 5 “Labor Day” hurricane that killed more than 400 people. This is the third-lowest barometric pressure ever recorded during an Atlantic hurricane, behind only Wilma in 2005 and Gilbert in 1988 (both readings were recorded offshore).
The world’s low-pressure record of 25.69 inches was set over the Pacific Ocean, during Typhoon Tip in Oct. 1979.
For comparison, standard sea-level barometric pressure is 29.92 inches, while the highest pressure reading of all-time was 32.01 inches, set in the Soviet Union in Dec. 1968.
This USA TODAY resource page has more about understanding air pressure.
(Answered by Doyle Rice, USA TODAY's weather editor, April 28, 2008)

Greening the cotton chain: H&M and Wal-Mart move upstream « Edwin Rutten's Blog Nice post, The world needs more of this!

Greening the cotton chain: H&M and Wal-Mart move upstream « Edwin Rutten's Blog


Greening the cotton chain: H&M and Wal-Mart move upstream

Wal-Mart and H&M, two of the world’s largest clothing retailers, are starting pilot programs with their Chinese textile suppliers to reduce water, energy, and chemical use in their supply chains according to this newspost on ProcurementLeaders. Both companies will focus at key mills for reducing their environmental footprint.
According to Linda Greer, director of the Health Program at NRDC and Clean by Design creator, “People don’t think of the fashion industry as polluting the environment like chemical or steel manufacturing, but in fact it is one of the biggest polluters in China.”
Please join me in having a closer look into this supply chain…
The textile supply chain generally consists of the following steps: 1. fibre production, 2. spinning, 3. fabric production, 4. dying/finishing, 5. clothing production and finally 6. clothing retailing.
The pilots will focus on low-cost practices that dramatically cut water, energy, and chemical use in textile dyeing and finishing. This is a great initiative, and a logical next step ‘upstream’ after a focus on social issues like child labour and poor labour conditions in clothing production.
From a supply chain perspective, it’s good to consider all the ‘People’ and ‘Planet’ issues from the ‘source to shop’. In the cotton case, there are quite some negative effects as well at the fibre production stage, as can been seen in Figure 1 below. Yet, it’s a start and a matter of choice where to start (start from the source or move upstream from the end).

Wait – Don’t Miss Out: Live Better for Less Overseas - International Living has been quoted in MSN Money, The New York Times, The O'Reilly Factor (Fox News), The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Forbes Personal Finance, ABC News, Smart Money, the AARP, The Dallas Morning News, San Francisco Chronicle, and elsewhere. For more, see the IL media center.







Oct. 28, 2012
Dear International Living Reader,
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Our newest, report reveals 5 towns where you could live like a diplomat... on the cheap.
I’d like to send it to you—FREE today...
Sincerely,
Jackie Flynn
Publisher, International Living

International Living has been quoted in MSN Money, The New York Times, The O'Reilly Factor (Fox News), The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Forbes Personal Finance, ABC News, Smart Money, the AARP, The Dallas Morning News, San Francisco Chronicle, and elsewhere. For more, see the IL media center.


Wait – Don’t Miss Out:

Live Better for Less Overseas

Learn about the world's 9 best places to live or retire. Live well on $30 a Day.
Own an exotic beachfront getaway for $35,000. Or romantic pied-a-terre for under $60,000. Enjoy

Bust To Boom: Why Housing Matters, Economically : NPR

Bust To Boom: Why Housing Matters, Economically : NPR

StamfordPlus.com News - Malloy announces assistant grants for Essex, Hebron, Monroe, Tolland, and the Borough of Woodmont in Milford

Borough of Woodmont (Milford) was awarded $500,000 to renovate and convert the Milford Fire House #5 to a borough town hall to house municipal offices, a community meeting place, and a social hall. Fifty construction jobs will be created as the two locations are redeveloped.

"I am grateful to Governor Malloy for this very important funding,” said State Senator Gayle Slossberg (D-Milford). “This grant will allow Woodmont to repurpose the decommissioned Fire Station and create a center for the community to meet, hold events, and provide services to seniors and youths. It will create short- and long-term benefits for Woodmont. I am proud to have worked with the Governor, the Mayor and the Borough President to make the new Borough hall a reality."

"The funding will provide the Borough of Woodmont an excellent building for borough business and other community activities. The current firehouse will replace a temporary structure that has served residents for more than 40 years," said State Representative Richard Roy (D-Milford). “I wish to compliment borough officials past and present for their work, as well as other citizens for their input in obtaining the funding for a much-needed building.”

“I’m grateful to our state delegation as well as the Governor’s office for their tremendous leadership and support in securing this important grant," said Benjamin G. Blake, Mayor of Milford.
StamfordPlus.com News - Malloy announces assistant grants for Essex, Hebron, Monroe, Tolland, and the Borough of Woodmont in Milford


This is wonderful news. We will be able to hold many more community activities in this building. 

Don't be afraid ofthe Sea Witch | The Daily Times | delmarvanow.com

Don't be afraid ofthe Sea Witch | The Daily Times | delmarvanow.com

I have always loved Halloween because of the story telling aspect. I love costumes and story telling. Milford, CT has the longest shoreline of any CT city. We need to find more ways to capitalize our best asset.  

 REHOBOTH BEACH — What started 23 years ago as a Halloween celebration on a $5,000 budget has transformed into the one of the biggest events of the year.
The celebration is the Sea Witch Halloween & Fiddler’s Festival, organized by the Rehoboth Beach-Dewey Beach Chamber of Commerce.
This year’s event, set to take place Oct. 26-28, should attract more than 175,000 people, according to Chamber President and CEO Carol Everhart.
“If you look at the program, where else are you going to have a Sea Witch?”, she asked. “Where else are you going to have a horse promenade on the beach? Where else are you going to see that many people in a coastal community? It’s got to be the largest gathering of costumes and folks having fun.”
New this year, Sea Witch will extend south into Dewey. There, a number of free events will take place, including a haunted bonfire at the beach and trick-or-treating with area businesses Friday night. Free shuttle service from the Rehoboth Beach Bandstand will be provided courtesy of the Jolly Trolley.
On Saturday, Alley Oop will host the skimboarding event, with participants in costume. There will also be Halloween parties for the over-21 crowd at Dewey Beach bars.
Kelly Ranieri, executive director of the Dewey Business Partnership, said Dewey business owners are excited to participate in the event.
“We want to be part of it,” she said. “The DBP is committed to bringing shoulder-season events to Dewey Beach, and we thought it was a perfect opportunity to expand Sea Witch into Dewey.”
As always, thousands of costumed participants are expected to participate in the costume parade, which will have a full slate of 50 floats and rolling vehicles.
Rehoboth Beach resident George Palmer has been a festival volunteer for 13 years and helps coordinate the parade.
Each year, he’s more impressed by the costumes on display.
Over the years, some costumes that have stood out include a family crab feast, with the parent dressed as a mallet and the children as little crabs, and a homemade wagon with children dressed as chicks and the parents dressed up as a hen and rooster.
“I think it’s very nice to see the creativity in the costumes that the youngsters wear and the parents wear,” he said. “You can tell the family has a great time.”
Because last year’s parade was rained out, there will be two grand marshals, the Caggiano family of Nicola Pizza and the Prestipino family of Apple Electric.
Palmer said it’s nice to see the eastern Sussex County area come together for the annual festival.
“The joy, the fun, there’s no negativity about it,” he said.
“It’s a great thing that I think brings the entire broad community together.”

Robert Ballard | Profile on TED.com STEM Adventure Schools - An Education that prepares you to excel in the REAL WORLD, A 21st CENTURY EDUCATION) Educational Cooperatives.

Robert Ballard | Profile on TED.com

Speakers Robert Ballard: Oceanographer

On more than 120 deep-sea expeditions, Robert Ballard has made many major natural discoveries, such as the deep-sea vents. Oh, and he found the Titanic.

Why you should listen to him:

From an early age, Robert Ballard was intrigued by the deep. He's perhaps best-known for his work in underwater archaeology; in addition to Titanic, he has found the wrecks of the Bismarck, the USS Yorktown, the nuclear sub Thresher (on a top-secret mission for the Navy -- for which the Titanic was his cover story) and John F. Kennedy's PT-109.
His contributions to our scientific knowledge of the ocean is just as awe-inspiring. He was in the first team of humans to view the deep-sea vents, and to understand how life can not only survive but thrive in these deep black waters, under extreme pressure and at extreme temperature.
He's also a powerful storyteller and a passionate scientific educator. He founded the Institute for Exploration and has pioneered distance learning in classrooms around the world. Through his JASON Project, 1.7 million students a year join scientists virtually as they experience the thrill of exploration and discovery.
"Mr. Ballard has long been blessed with the special luck of a successful explorer as well as the special knowledge of a leading scientist."
New York Times Email to a friend »

Quotes by Robert Ballard

  • “Everything I’m going to present to you was not in my textbooks when I went to school … not even in my college textbooks. I’m a geophysicist, and [in] all my Earth science books when I was a student — I had to give the wrong answer to get an A.” Watch this talk »
  • “I would not let an adult drive my robot. You don’t have enough gaming experience. But I will let a kid with no license take control of my vehicle system.” Watch this talk »
More TEDQuotes…

cogeneration honda voted most sustainable award - Avira Search Free powered by Ask.com

cogeneration honda voted most sustainable award - Avira Search Free powered by Ask.com

 Compact Household Cogeneration Units - Honda
world.honda.com/cogenerator/
ecoPOWER 1.0 Micro-Cogeneration System is Germany's Most Sustainable ... Vaillant convinced the prestigious jury of the German Sustainability Award.

Asian bear sanctuary in jeopardy, Vietnam’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development is preparing a report on the eviction for the Prime Minister who will decide the fate of the bear's sanctuary.

vp@mard.gov.vn
ANOTHER CHANCE TO HELP STOP THE EVICTION!

Right now, Vietnam’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development is preparing a report on the eviction for the Prime Minister who will decide the fate of our sanctuary.

YOUR VOICE COUNTS.

We have an opportunity to convince the ministry that evicting Animals Asia’s sanctuary and its 104 bears is unjust and wrong at every level.

We’re told that they plan to submit their report on 26 October. That gives us very little time to make our case. Please send an URGENT email pointing out why the eviction must stop. (We have prepared one for you.)



If you're unable to open the e-mail link, please find sample e-mails and e-mail addresses here.

 http://www.all-creatures.org/anex/bear-bf-12_small.jpg

China's Fast Live Food, Yes it is horrible but Factory Grown American Food do you really believe it is any less horrible?

 

Storms Coming read this before you buy a generator! Next-Gen Cogeneration - Hvac, Renewable Energy, Company Culture - EcoHome Magazine

Next-Gen Cogeneration - Hvac, Renewable Energy, Company Culture - EcoHome Magazine

The Plot to Destroy America's Beer - Businessweek Great Article, I'm a subscriber,

The Plot to Destroy America's Beer - Businessweek

The Plot to Destroy America's Beer

By on October 25, 2012
Brian Rinfret likes imported beer from Germany. He sometimes buys Spaten. He enjoys an occasional Bitburger. When he was 25 years old, he discovered Beck’s, a pilsner brewed in the city of Bremen in accordance with the Reinheitsgebot, the German Purity Law of 1516. It said so right on the label. After that, Rinfret was hooked.
One Friday night in January, Rinfret, who is now 52, stopped on the way home from work at his local liquor store in Monroe, N.J., and purchased a 12-pack of Beck’s. When he got home, he opened a bottle. “I was like, what the hell?” he recalls. “It tasted light. It tasted weak. Just, you know, night and day. Bubbly, real fizzy. To me, it wasn’t German beer. It tasted like a Budweiser with flavoring.”
He examined the label. It said the beer was no longer brewed in Bremen. He looked more closely at the fine print: “Product of the USA.” This was profoundly unsettling for a guy who had been a Beck’s drinker for more than half his life. He was also miffed to have paid the full import price for the 12-pack.
Rinfret left a telephone message with AB InBev (BUD), the owner of Beck’s and many other beers, including Budweiser. Nobody got back to him. He had better luck with e-mail. An AB InBev employee informed him that Beck’s was now being brewed in St. Louis along with Budweiser. But never fear, the rep told Rinfret: AB InBev was using the same recipe as always.
He wasn’t satisfied. In March, he posted a plea on Beck’s official Facebook (FB) page: “Beck’s made in the U.S. not worth drinking. Bring back German Beck’s. Please.” He had plenty of company. “This is a travesty,” a fellow disgruntled Beck’s drinker raged. “I’m pretty bummed,” wrote another. “I’ve been drinking this beer religiously for over 20 years.” Rinfret kept trashing Beck’s on Facebook. Until, he says, AB InBev unfriended him in May. “They banned me from their site. I can’t post anything on there any longer.”
Rinfret was only temporarily silenced. He now complains on a Facebook page called Import Beck’s from Germany. AB InBev may be paying a price for disappointing Beck’s loyalists like him. According to Bump Williams, a beer industry consultant in Stratford, Conn., sales of Beck’s at U.S. food stores were down 14 percent in the four weeks ending Sept. 9 compared with the same period last year. “They are getting their proverbial asses kicked,” Williams says. “Too many customers were turned off when the switch was made.” Sales of Budweiser in the U.S. have fallen recently, too. And yet AB InBev is extraordinarily profitable.
There has never been a beer company like AB InBev. It was created in 2008 when InBev, the Leuven (Belgium)-based owner of Beck’s and Stella Artois, swallowed Anheuser-Busch, the maker of Budweiser, in a $52 billion hostile takeover. Today, AB InBev is the dominant beer company in the U.S., with 48 percent of the market. It controls 69 percent in Brazil; it’s the second-largest brewer in Russia and the third-largest in China. The company owns more than 200 different beers around the world. It would like to buy more.

Painkiller Patch Fentanyl May Have Killed 3,500 People, Warns FDA

Painkiller Patch Fentanyl May Have Killed 3,500 People, Warns FDA


Painkiller Patch Fentanyl May Have Killed 3,500 People, Warns FDA

Thursday, July 17, 2008 by: David Gutierrez, staff writer

15


(NaturalNews) The popular patch version of the pain killer fentanyl is suspected in more than 3,500 deaths, and the FDA has issued a new warning about its use.

The fentanyl patch is designed for patients with chronic pain, especially those who have trouble swallowing pills. The patch steadily releases the drug over the course of three days.

But the FDA warns that heat and exercise can cause the patch to release the drug at a faster and potentially lethal rate. Echoing the warning it issued in 2005, the FDA has told patients on fentanyl to avoid taking hot showers or using heating pads while wearing the patch. Patients who experience breathing problems while on the patch should call their doctors immediately, because high doses of the drug can cause the respiratory system to shut down.

The FDA also instructed doctors to only issue the patch to patients whose pain is not expected to improve and who are already safely taking pain killers in the morphine (opioid) family.

In order to strengthen the 2005 warning, which even the FDA acknowledges was insufficient, the agency has instructed drug makers to send out brochures that explain the dangers of the drug in plain language.

A 2006 study identified fentanyl as the responsible drug for more accidental deaths than any drug other than oxycodone, with 3,545 deaths linked to fentanyl between 1998 and 2005. According to lead author Thomas J. Moore, the patch form was "by far the largest contributor."

Many safety advocates have criticized the FDA's most recent warning as insufficient, noting that fentanyl has killed far more people than the 932 deaths attributed to Vioxx, which the FDA has withdrawn from the market

"I think there is more that needs to be done, or else we're just going to see this [warning] happen again another two years from now," said Michael Cohen, president of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. "The deaths are going to continue."

Washington Post Live Advancing Conversation| The Future of Food,

Washington Post Live | The Future of Food
10 to 20 thousand farm workers a year suffer acute pesticide poisoning. The men and women who harvest our food need organic farming the most!


May 4, 2011 - 9:00am - 4:30pm
Georgetown University | Washington, DC

Speaker Highlights

  • The investigative journalist and author of 'Fast Food Nation,; 'Reefer Madness,' and 'Chew on This,' speaks at the Washington Post Live event, The Future of Food. In this clip, Schlosser talks about why everyone needs organic food, including the people working in the field.
  • Joe Yonan, editor of food and travel at the Washington Post, asks Assistant White House Chef Sam Kass and renowned chef Dan Barber what's for dinner in the future. The interview took place over lunch at the Washington Post Live's "The Future of Food" conference.
  • His Royal Highness Prince Charles delivers the keynote address at the Washington Post Live event, The Future of Food.

Reichenbach leaves $3.88 billion legacy | Yale Daily News

Reichenbach leaves $3.88 billion legacy | Yale Daily News


Reichenbach leaves $3.88 billion legacy

When Inge Reichenbach retires at the end of June, she will leave behind a $3.8 billion legacy at the University.
Reichenbach was appointed Vice President for Development in 2005 to lead the Yale Tomorrow fundraising campaign, then still in the “silent” planning phases of a $3 billion drive for donations. Six years and $3.8 billion raised later, University President Richard Levin said that Reichenbach’s most notable achievements were her work on the campaign and her ability to develop leadership within the Office of Development. Outside of Yale, donors said that Reichenbach’s professionalism and caring personality were instrumental as she secured donations to Yale.
“Inge Reichenbach is not only one of the most talented people I have ever known in the development field — the legacy of $3.88 [billion] says it all — but she is also one of the finest people I have ever had the pleasure of working with,” said Yale Corporation Senior Fellow Edward Bass ’67, who also served as a co-chair for the campaign.
The campaign broke University records as brought in donations across its four goals of Yale College, the arts, the sciences and international efforts. During its five-year public phase, it netted several gifts of at least $50 million, including $100 million to eliminate tuition at the School of Music, $50 million toward a new campus for the School of Management and $50 million to establish 10 endowed professorships at the School of Engineering and Applied Science.
Roland Betts ’68, Yale Tomorrow co-chair and Yale Corporation senior fellow emeritus, said when the Corporation was looking for someone to lead Yale Tomorrow, Reichenbach was a clear choice. Before coming to Yale, Reichenbach had also set records as vice president of alumni affairs and development at Cornell University from 1995–’05.
“Her name was at the top of everybody’s list,” Betts said. “[When she came to Yale] we felt from the beginning that we had the best person in the country, and I would say that over the course of the campaign she proved that.”

Hawthorn Berries, anti-cancer effects of hawthorn In the 1920s there were many doctors using an extract of the hawthorn berry for treating what was then called 'dropsy'.They were nearly all put out for business by 1926. The medical journal, Medical World , fostered unorthodox modalities. It carried a report in 1930 about how the glycoside in the hawthorn berry was much like digitalis. It also said that, unlike digitalis, the hawthorn glycoside was not toxic in an overdose. Are Heart Drugs Better for the Treatment of Cancer, It's so inexpensive that it would be locked in a closet and called old wives tales.

Are Heart Drugs Better for the Treatment of Cancer http://www.second-opinions.co.uk/heart_drugs.html

Are Heart Drugs Better for the Treatment of Cancer


Digitalis is the right drug being used to treat the wrong disease.
Wayne Martin.

Introduction

Several different types of drug, used or developed for the treatment of heart disease, have been found to have dramatic beneficial effects on a wide range of cancers.

Digitalis

Extracts of the foxglove have been documented in folk remedies for a number of conditions and for hundreds of years. Since William Withering published his book, An Account of the Foxglove and Some of its Medical Uses , in 1785, digitalis has been used by conventional medicine in the treatment of cardiac congestion and some cardiac arrhythmias.
As a student at Purdue University in 1930, Wayne Martin had as a tutor a seventy-year old medical doctor who had lost his money in the 1929 stock market crash and had taken a $60.00 a month instructorship at the university. Using the files of the Indiana University School of Medicine this doctor had done a survey between 1900 and 1930 of patients maintained on digitalis for life (digitalis was then used for heart patients). What he found was that not one of them had died of cancer. He was unable to get his survey published. At Purdue, Wayne says, the staff thought him to be suffering from dementia and he soon learned that if he wanted to keep his instructorship it was best not to talk about digitalis and cancer. (1)
In 1974, Dr Bjorn Stenkvist of University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, made application to the United States National Cancer Institutes for funds to conduct a clinical trial of the therapeutic effects of digitalis in breast cancer. The funds were granted, the study done. In 1980, they found that tumours in patients on digitalis medication at the time of diagnosis of breast cancer seemed to develop much more slowly than tumours in patients not on such medication. (2) and the results, published in 1982, (3) were not just good, they were astounding. In this study forty-four breast cancer patients were maintained on digitalis from the time of surgery fro five years. Among them there was only one recurrence of cancer. The trial's control group consisted of eighty-eight breast cancer patients who were not taking digitalis. In this group there were twenty-one recurrences of cancer - 9.6 times as many. In other words, the digitalis reduced cancers by almost ninety percent.
In 1984 Drs A G Goldin and A R Safa, of the National Cancer Institutes (NCI), Bethesda, Maryland confirmed Stengkvist's results. Conducting a retrospective study of 127 cancer patients in their records, of a total of twenty-one deaths they found only one cancer death among those who had taken digitalis. (4)
For many years Martin was surprised that there was no follow-up to Stenkvist's most promising trial, particularly as it had NCI support. In the mid-1990s Dr Johan Haux of the Institute of Cancer Research and Molecular Biology at the University of Trondheim, Norway, had shown an interest in Coley's Toxins and Martin had had a correspondence with Haux on this subject. Martin asked Haux if he could find Dr Stenkvist which he did. Dr Stenkvist was in retirement. However, he reported that the Chief oncologist at University Hospital at the time took no interest in his work and he, Stenkvist, had been unable to interest any pharmaceutical firm in a cancer treatment on which they could not get a patent and which sold for fifteen cents a day.
At that time Haux was looking for a subject for his PhD thesis. In May 1997 Martin sent Haux the digitalis story and suggested he pursue it. Haux started his work with two breast cancer cell lines, one oestrogen positive and one oestrogen negative. Using highly sophisticated testing methods, he treated these two cultures with digitoxin, the natural form of digitalis from the common foxglove ( Digitalis purpurea ), and in six days preparations used are digitoxin, and digoxin, saw an almost complete inhibition of growth of these two breast cancer cell lines. He determined that this inhibition was due to apoptosis (cell death). Haux also tested the more widely used digoxin, a preparation from the white foxglove ( Digitalis lanata ) the drug of choice in Britain and the USA today. This had very little anti-cancer effect. (In the Stenkvist report of 1982 one third of his patients were getting digitoxin, the other two thirds were getting digoxin. In the NCI letter of 1984 there was a cancer death in the patients taking digitalis but by then the vast majority of patients taking digitalis were getting digoxin.)
Haux then grew cultures of malignant human T cell line Jurkat and B lymphoblastoid cell line Daudi These cancer cell lines were inhibited to an even greater extent than the breast cancer cell lines, again by apoptosis. Digoxin was even less effective. Digitoxin and digoxin were also tested against a fifth cell line, K562, and against normal cells. With these there was no effect.
Haux sent his first report to the medical journal, Cancer Research . It was rejected. The first reaction from conventional medicine to the suggestion that digitoxin could be an anti-cancer drug was "ridiculous". He then sent it to the British Journal of Cancer . In this submission Haux only claimed that in a harmless concentration to humans, digitoxin will inhibit Jurkat cells. Again it was refused. The study was finally published in 1999 in the Journal of Oncology . (5)
The hospital where Haux worked were using a chemotherapeutic drug, Actinomycin D in treating cancer at the hospital. The belief is that if an anti-cancer drug will inhibit the Jurkat cell line, it has a bright future. Haux did a test that got the attention of the management at the Trondheim hospital. Haux tested Actinomycin D against his Jurkat cell line at a concentration used to treat cancer patients. It had almost no inhibitory effect at all. In September 1997 a decision was taken at Trondheim to begin treating breast cancer patients with digitoxin.
In a subsequent study, Haux tested digitoxin and digoxin against three brain cancer (glioblastoma) cell lines with similar results to his other trials. (6) He is currently studying whether the cancer rate is changed in a cohort of 8,000 cardiac patients on digitoxin compared with controls.
Encouraged by Hauk's research, Stenkvist conducted a long-term follow-up (22.3 years) of 175 of his previous patients with breast carcinoma, of which 32 were on digitalis treatment when their breast cancer was diagnosed. He found only two (six percent) of the thirty-two patients on digitalis had died from breast cancer compared to forty-nine (thirty-four percent) of the patients not on digitalis. Stenkvist says that although the few deaths in the digitalis group made statistical analysis difficult, nevertheless, "serious consideration should be given to the effects of digitalis derivatives on cancer cells in cancer drug design. This field of research is not sufficiently explored and holds promise to contain drugs superior to present-day adjuvant therapy both with respect to effects and side-effects". (7)

Hawthorn

In the 1920s there were many doctors using an extract of the hawthorn berry for treating what was then called 'dropsy'.They were nearly all put out for business by 1926. The medical journal, Medical World , fostered unorthodox modalities. It carried a report in 1930 about how the glycoside in the hawthorn berry was much like digitalis. It also said that, unlike digitalis, the hawthorn glycoside was not toxic in an overdose. Thus it may be worthwhile studying the anti-cancer effects of hawthorn too.

Anticoagulation drugs

Cancers which do not spread are called 'benign' and generally not considered particularly dangerous. It is the 'malignant' ones which metastasise (spread) which are the killers, for once a cancer has metastasised, conventional medicine has no effective remedy. It is vital, therefore, that once a cancer has been discovered, it is not allowed to metastasise. Fortunately, there seems to be a simple way to stop, or at least inhibit, a cancer's spread. That is the use of an anticoagulation drug such as warfarin or heparin. These are cheap, generic drugs routinely used in cases of heart attack and blood clots (thromboembolism).
It was demonstrated as long ago as 1903 that distant metastases from cancer cells circulating in the bloodstream couldn't end up just anywhere, that for a distant tumour to form, it needed a thrombus (clot) at the site of the metastasis to be. (8) This was confirmed in 1915 (9) and 1956 (10) . In 1956 and 1957 (11) two groups of scientists also demonstrated independently that anticoagulants inhibited local tumour growth.
In 1958 Professor R A Q O'Meara of Trinity College, Dublin, showed that dividing cancer cells were surrounded by fibrils which gave off clotting factors just as platelets do, causing the deposition of fibrin. (12) He suggested that this was essential for tumour growth. In this way, he taught, a cancer colony becomes coated with fibrin which prevents cancer cell killing immunocytes from making contact with and killing it. When Martin met him in 1966, O'Meara had expanded his hypothesis in line with Schmidt and was teaching that a cancer cell travelling in the bloodstream could not form a distant metastasis without there being a small fibrin clot at the site of the metastasis to be.

Are Heart Drugs Better for the Treatment of Cancer. Interesting

Are Heart Drugs Better for the Treatment of Cancer

Digitalis is the right drug being used to treat the wrong disease.
Wayne Martin.

Introduction

Several different types of drug, used or developed for the treatment of heart disease, have been found to have dramatic beneficial effects on a wide range of cancers.
Digitalis

Extracts of the foxglove have been documented in folk remedies for a number of conditions and for hundreds of years. Since William Withering published his book, An Account of the Foxglove and Some of its Medical Uses , in 1785, digitalis has been used by conventional medicine in the treatment of cardiac congestion and some cardiac arrhythmias.

As a student at Purdue University in 1930, Wayne Martin had as a tutor a seventy-year old medical doctor who had lost his money in the 1929 stock market crash and had taken a $60.00 a month instructorship at the university. Using the files of the Indiana University School of Medicine this doctor had done a survey between 1900 and 1930 of patients maintained on digitalis for life (digitalis was then used for heart patients). What he found was that not one of them had died of cancer. He was unable to get his survey published. At Purdue, Wayne says, the staff thought him to be suffering from dementia and he soon learned that if he wanted to keep his instructorship it was best not to talk about digitalis and cancer. (1)

In 1974, Dr Bjorn Stenkvist of University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, made application to the United States National Cancer Institutes for funds to conduct a clinical trial of the therapeutic effects of digitalis in breast cancer. The funds were granted, the study done. In 1980, they found that tumours in patients on digitalis medication at the time of diagnosis of breast cancer seemed to develop much more slowly than tumours in patients not on such medication. (2) and the results, published in 1982, (3) were not just good, they were astounding. In this study forty-four breast cancer patients were maintained on digitalis from the time of surgery fro five years. Among them there was only one recurrence of cancer. The trial's control group consisted of eighty-eight breast cancer patients who were not taking digitalis. In this group there were twenty-one recurrences of cancer - 9.6 times as many. In other words, the digitalis reduced cancers by almost ninety percent.

In 1984 Drs A G Goldin and A R Safa, of the National Cancer Institutes (NCI), Bethesda, Maryland confirmed Stengkvist's results. Conducting a retrospective study of 127 cancer patients in their records, of a total of twenty-one deaths they found only one cancer death among those who had taken digitalis. (4)

For many years Martin was surprised that there was no follow-up to Stenkvist's most promising trial, particularly as it had NCI support. In the mid-1990s Dr Johan Haux of the Institute of Cancer Research and Molecular Biology at the University of Trondheim, Norway, had shown an interest in Coley's Toxins and Martin had had a correspondence with Haux on this subject. Martin asked Haux if he could find Dr Stenkvist which he did. Dr Stenkvist was in retirement. However, he reported that the Chief oncologist at University Hospital at the time took no interest in his work and he, Stenkvist, had been unable to interest any pharmaceutical firm in a cancer treatment on which they could not get a patent and which sold for fifteen cents a day.

At that time Haux was looking for a subject for his PhD thesis. In May 1997 Martin sent Haux the digitalis story and suggested he pursue it. Haux started his work with two breast cancer cell lines, one oestrogen positive and one oestrogen negative. Using highly sophisticated testing methods, he treated these two cultures with digitoxin, the natural form of digitalis from the common foxglove ( Digitalis purpurea ), and in six days preparations used are digitoxin, and digoxin, saw an almost complete inhibition of growth of these two breast cancer cell lines. He determined that this inhibition was due to apoptosis (cell death). Haux also tested the more widely used digoxin, a preparation from the white foxglove ( Digitalis lanata ) the drug of choice in Britain and the USA today. This had very little anti-cancer effect. (In the Stenkvist report of 1982 one third of his patients were getting digitoxin, the other two thirds were getting digoxin. In the NCI letter of 1984 there was a cancer death in the patients taking digitalis but by then the vast majority of patients taking digitalis were getting digoxin.)

Haux then grew cultures of malignant human T cell line Jurkat and B lymphoblastoid cell line Daudi These cancer cell lines were inhibited to an even greater extent than the breast cancer cell lines, again by apoptosis. Digoxin was even less effective. Digitoxin and digoxin were also tested against a fifth cell line, K562, and against normal cells. With these there was no effect.

Haux sent his first report to the medical journal, Cancer Research . It was rejected. The first reaction from conventional medicine to the suggestion that digitoxin could be an anti-cancer drug was "ridiculous". He then sent it to the British Journal of Cancer . In this submission Haux only claimed that in a harmless concentration to humans, digitoxin will inhibit Jurkat cells. Again it was refused. The study was finally published in 1999 in the Journal of Oncology . (5)

The hospital where Haux worked were using a chemotherapeutic drug, Actinomycin D in treating cancer at the hospital. The belief is that if an anti-cancer drug will inhibit the Jurkat cell line, it has a bright future. Haux did a test that got the attention of the management at the Trondheim hospital. Haux tested Actinomycin D against his Jurkat cell line at a concentration used to treat cancer patients. It had almost no inhibitory effect at all. In September 1997 a decision was taken at Trondheim to begin treating breast cancer patients with digitoxin.

In a subsequent study, Haux tested digitoxin and digoxin against three brain cancer (glioblastoma) cell lines with similar results to his other trials. (6) He is currently studying whether the cancer rate is changed in a cohort of 8,000 cardiac patients on digitoxin compared with controls.

Encouraged by Hauk's research, Stenkvist conducted a long-term follow-up (22.3 years) of 175 of his previous patients with breast carcinoma, of which 32 were on digitalis treatment when their breast cancer was diagnosed. He found only two (six percent) of the thirty-two patients on digitalis had died from breast cancer compared to forty-nine (thirty-four percent) of the patients not on digitalis. Stenkvist says that although the few deaths in the digitalis group made statistical analysis difficult, nevertheless, "serious consideration should be given to the effects of digitalis derivatives on cancer cells in cancer drug design. This field of research is not sufficiently explored and holds promise to contain drugs superior to present-day adjuvant therapy both with respect to effects and side-effects". (7)
Hawthorn

In the 1920s there were many doctors using an extract of the hawthorn berry for treating what was then called 'dropsy'.They were nearly all put out for business by 1926. The medical journal, Medical World , fostered unorthodox modalities. It carried a report in 1930 about how the glycoside in the hawthorn berry was much like digitalis. It also said that, unlike digitalis, the hawthorn glycoside was not toxic in an overdose. Thus it may be worthwhile studying the anti-cancer effects of hawthorn too.
Anticoagulation drugs

Cancers which do not spread are called 'benign' and generally not considered particularly dangerous. It is the 'malignant' ones which metastasise (spread) which are the killers, for once a cancer has metastasised, conventional medicine has no effective remedy. It is vital, therefore, that once a cancer has been discovered, it is not allowed to metastasise. Fortunately, there seems to be a simple way to stop, or at least inhibit, a cancer's spread. That is the use of an anticoagulation drug such as warfarin or heparin. These are cheap, generic drugs routinely used in cases of heart attack and blood clots (thromboembolism).

It was demonstrated as long ago as 1903 that distant metastases from cancer cells circulating in the bloodstream couldn't end up just anywhere, that for a distant tumour to form, it needed a thrombus (clot) at the site of the metastasis to be. (8) This was confirmed in 1915 (9) and 1956 (10) . In 1956 and 1957 (11) two groups of scientists also demonstrated independently that anticoagulants inhibited local tumour growth.

In 1958 Professor R A Q O'Meara of Trinity College, Dublin, showed that dividing cancer cells were surrounded by fibrils which gave off clotting factors just as platelets do, causing the deposition of fibrin. (12) He suggested that this was essential for tumour growth. In this way, he taught, a cancer colony becomes coated with fibrin which prevents cancer cell killing immunocytes from making contact with and killing it. When Martin met him in 1966, O'Meara had expanded his hypothesis in line with Schmidt and was teaching that a cancer cell travelling in the bloodstream could not form a distant metastasis without there being a small fibrin clot at the site of the metastasis to be.

O'Meara had a student, L Michaels, who when qualified went to Canada. In 1960, nearly all patients who had survived a heart attack or a thrombotic stroke were being anticoagulated for year on year with warfarin or other anticoagulation drug. These drugs prevented the formation of fibrin. Michaels reasoned that if O'Meara was right, then there should be far fewer cancer deaths among the several million anticoagulated population. So Michaels did a 1,500 patient-year study of these patients. (13) What he found was that they had only one-eighth the expected numbers of cancer deaths. He also found that in his study population there was not a single death from a metastasis. There was only one death and that was from primary lung cancer. Among the study group were two breast cancer patients. Neither developed metastases.
Streptokinase - the clot (and cancer) buster

When a person has a heart attack one of the first things that is done on his reaching hospital is an infusion of a fibrinolytic (clot-busting) drug, streptokinase. This is to break down any clot that may be blocking a coronary artery.

Professor Leo Zacharski, Department of Medicine, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire, has researched anticoagulant drugs extensively. He talks of a spectacular case of a woman who had widely metastatic endometrial cancer. She was already in a very bad way when she suffered a heart attack which may actually have saved her life. Because of the heart attack she was given streptokinase. "One week later" says Zacharski, "her tumor showed marked regression which has persisted for many months". (14)

Professor Zacharski wrote a comprehensive review of anticoagulant drugs in The Cancer Journal - Volume 6, Number 1 (January-February 1993).
Conclusion

Many, if not all, of the drugs used to prevent or control heart attacks have a long history of efficacy in the fight against cancer. Despite this few, if any, are used for this purpose. The problem, I believe, is that the clinical trials required by regulatory bodies today before any drug can be licensed for use are so costly that no drug company, with no chance of a patent on the drug, would be willing to sponsor such a trial. It is left, therefore, for the cancer patient to hope that he or she develops heart problems along with the cancer so that he/she gets the better treatment than oncologists offer.
References

1. Martin W. Personal communication, 1997.
2. Stenkvist B, et al. Evidence of a modifying influence of heart glucosides on the development of breast cancer. Anal Quant Cytol 1980; 2: 49-54.
3. Stenkvist B, et al. Cardiac glycosides and breast cancer, revisited. N Engl J Med 1982; 306:484.
4. Goldin AG, Safa AR. Digitalis and cancer. Lancet 1984;1:1134.
5. Haux J, et al. Digitoxin, in non toxic concentrations, induces apoptotic cell death in Jurkat T cells in vitro. Germ J Oncol 1999; 31: 14-20.
6. Haux J. Digitoxin is a potential anticancer agent for several types of cancer. Med Hyp 1999; 53: 543-8
7. Stenkvist B. Is digitalis a therapy for breast carcinoma? Oncol Rep 1999; 6: 493-6.
8. Schmidt MB. Cited by Iwasaki T. J Path Bact 1915; 20: 85.
9. Iwasaki T. J Path Bact 1915; 20: 85.
10. Wood S jr, Holyoke ED, Yardley JH. Proc Am Assn Cancer Res 1956; 2: 157.
11. Lacour F, Oberling CH, Guerin M. Bull Assn Franç Cancer 1957; 44: 88.
12. O'Meara RAQ. The coagulative properties of cancer. Irish J Med 1958; 394: 474-9.
13. Michaels L. Cancer incidence and mortality in patients having anticoagulant therapy. Lancet 1964; ii: 832-5.
14. Leo R Zacharski. Fax to Wayne Martin, 7 February 1994.

Last updated18 December 2000

Lateral thinking - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Improve your creativity with lateral thinking.


Lateral thinking - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Improve your creativity with lateral thinking.

Lateral thinking - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Lateral thinking is solving problems through an indirect and creative approach, using reasoning that is not immediately obvious and involving ideas that may not be obtainable by using only traditional step-by-step logic.
The term was invented in 1967 by Edward de Bono.
Lateral thinking is different from our normal perceptions regarding creativity and innovation, and it is an alternative to pure vertical logic/scientism and pure horizontal imagination/spirituality:
Purely horizontal thinking is known as daydreaming, fantasy, mysticism. The purely horizontal thinker has a thousand ideas but puts none of them into action. He or she sees the big picture and all its possibilities but has little interest in linear, step-by-step implementation.
Purely vertical thinking is the classic method for problem solving: from the given data step by step working out the solution.

Contents

Methods

Critical thinking is primarily concerned with judging the true value of statements and seeking errors. Lateral thinking is more concerned with the movement value of statements and ideas. A person uses lateral thinking to move from one known idea to creating new ideas. Edward de Bono defines four types of thinking tools:
  • Idea generating tools that are designed to break current thinking patterns—routine patterns, the status quo
  • Focus tools that are designed to broaden where to search for new ideas
  • Harvest tools that are designed to ensure more value is received from idea generating output
  • Treatment tools that are designed to consider real-world constraints, resources, and support[1]
Random Entry Idea Generating Tool: The thinker chooses an object at random, or a noun from a dictionary, and associate that with the area they are thinking about. For example, if they are thinking about how to improve a website, an object chosen at random from the environment around them might be a fax machine. A fax machine transmits images over the phone to paper. Fax machines are becoming rare. People send faxes directly to phone numbers. Perhaps this could suggest a new way to embed the website's content in emails and other sites.
Provocation Idea Generating Tool: The use any of the provocation techniques—wishful thinking, exaggeration, reversal, escape, distortion, or arising. The thinker creates a list of provocations and then uses the most outlandish ones to move their thinking forward to new ideas.
Movement Techniques: The thinker develops provocation operations[clarification needed] by the following methods: extract a principle, focus on the difference, moment to moment, positive aspects, special circumstances.
Challenge Idea Generating Tool: A tool which is designed to ask the question "Why?" in a non-threatening way: why something exists, why it is done the way it is. The result is a very clear understanding of "Why?" which naturally leads to fresh new ideas. The goal is to be able to challenge anything at all, not just items which are problems. For example, one could challenge the handles on coffee cups. The reason for the handle seems to be that the cup is often too hot to hold directly. Perhaps coffee cups could be made with insulated finger grips, or there could be separate coffee cup holders similar to beer holders.
Concept Fan Idea Generating Tool: Ideas carry out concepts. This tool systematically expands the range and number of concepts in order to end up with a very broad range of ideas to consider.
Disproving: Based on the idea that the majority is always wrong (as suggested by Henrik Ibsen and John Kenneth Galbraith), take anything that is obvious and generally accepted as "goes without saying", question it, take an opposite view, and try to convincingly disprove it. This technique is similar to de Bono's "Black Hat" of the Six Thinking Hats, which looks at the ways in which something will not work.

Lateral thinking and problem solving

Problem Solving: When something creates a problem, the performance or the status quo of the situation drops. Problem solving deals with finding out what caused the problem and then figuring out ways to fix the problem. The objective is to get the situation to where it should be.
For example, a production line has an established run rate of 1000 items per hour. Suddenly, the run rate drops to 800 items per hour. Ideas as to why this happened and solutions to repair the production line must be thought of, such as giving the worker a pay raise.
Creative Problem Solving: Using creativity, one must solve a problem in an indirect and unconventional manner.
For example, if a production line produced 1000 books per hour, creative problem solving could find ways to produce more books per hour, use the production line, or reduce the cost to run the production line.
Creative Problem Identification: Many of the greatest non-technological innovations are identified while realizing an improved process or design in everyday objects and tasks either by accidental chance or by studying and documenting real world experience.
Lateral Thinking puzzles: This is puzzles that are supposed to demonstrate what lateral thinking is about. However any puzzle that has only one solution "is" not lateral. While lateral thinking may help you construct such puzzles, the lateral thinking tools will seldom help you solve puzzles.
Lateral Problem "Solving": Lateral thinking will often produce solutions whereby the problems appears as "obvious" in hindsight. That lateral thinking will often lead to problems that you never knew you had, or it will solve simple problems that have a huge potential.
For example, if a production line produced 1000 books per hour, lateral thinking may suggest that a drop in output to 800 would lead to higher quality, more motivated workers etc. etc.

Education

Lateral thinking can be taught and originally Edward de Bono put forward an education program for teaching thinking. CoRT spans some 80 different tools for thinking. Lateral thinking is a serious alternative to say training in creativity, and as such the tools must be taught and trained using a didactic and pedagogical approach very different form both the training in logic/analyses (vertical thinking) and the training in creativity/sensibility (horizontal thinking).
The training is thus only to be conducted by teachers that must make use of the automatized materials. This ensures that the education is not biased towards neither of the opposing political positions, that is the vertical ("right wing" stereotype) or the horizontal position ("left wing" stereotype). Conducting the education of young kids form the age of 5-7 years, will thus counter any bias (unintended as well as intended).
Based on the cognitive knowledge the correctly conducted teaching and training will thus protect the pupils form various pedagogical approaches Cognitivism. When taught in the correct way the pupils will learn strong thinking, as an alternative to thinking purely based in traditional vertical/horizontal thinking. The result of this is that all pupils should maintain their original thinking bias, as any other "thinking training" would carry a political favour.
To further counter the influencing on the pupils original thinking style you have Parallel thinking, where you can combine various lateral thinking tools - either alone or with other thinkers. Using parallel thinking (not the Yoga version) in this way will again protect the individuality of each of the pupils.

Starbucks Flies the Holiday Snowflakes - YouTube Great STEM Activity for families and schools

Starbucks Flies the Holiday Snowflakes - YouTube

Clean Cities: New Haven Clean Cities coalition

Clean Cities: New Haven Clean Cities coalition


New Haven Clean Cities Coalition

The New Haven Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation.
New Haven Clean Cities coalition

Contact Information

Lee Grannis
203-627-3715
lgrannis@snet.net
Brian McGrath
203-627-6874
soggy3@aol.com
Coalition Website

Clean Cities Coordinators

Coord
Lee Grannis
Coord
Coord
Brian McGrath
Coord
Photo of Lee Grannis Lee Grannis started the New Haven Clean Cities coalition in 1995 and has served as the coalition's coordinator for the last 12 years.
As part of his Clean Cities mission, Grannis has developed projects and obtained federal and matching funding for compressed natural gas, light duty electric vehicles, electric transit, hydrogen hybrid and biodiesel projects, and outreach project funding. He has provided alternative vehicle/fuel consultation and assistance to many organizations in Connecticut and outside the state, including several towns and cities, metropolitan transit authorities, utilities, community colleges, universities, laboratories, and airports. He serves as an on-call advisor to Connecticut state government staffs and Connecticut's U.S. Congressional and Senatorial staff. Recently, his coalition in partnership with the three other Connecticut Clean Cities and 27 other partners was awarded $26 million including partner match from the U.S. Department of Energy for alternative fuel infrastructure and vehicle deployment in Connecticut. Grannis has been selected as the Northeast Region Clean Cities Coordinator of the Year in 2004 and 2008.
Grannis retired after 23 years as a lieutenant colonel infantry from the U.S. Army. He held several combat and logistical positions, which included two combat tours in Vietnam. He attended several military schools and is a graduate of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Grannis has a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Eastern Kentucky University in Political Science and a Master of Arts in Public Administration from Central Michigan University.
Greater New Haven Clean Cities Coalition
61 Rolling Green Road
Bethany, CT 06524