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May 8, 9:30am until 11:30 come enjoy a presentation by Farmland Connections! Discover the in and outs of leasing land in your community. Why Farming? SPIN in the City |EMagazine.com

SPIN in the City |EMagazine.com

 SPIN in the City - A New Form of Farming That Can Transform Cities

June 30, 2009 | Miranda Spencer |
A SPIN farm in Canada.
© Photos: Wally Satzewich
Using the SPIN model, growing ranks of the green-thumbed in North American cities and towns are becoming farmers, raising and selling organic produce on sub-acre backyard plots or vacant lots. In so doing, they"re setting the stage for sustainable, local-foods economies—one city and one farm at a time.
SPIN, which stands for Small Plot Intensive relay farming, downsizes traditional organic farming methods and combines them with a franchise-like business formula. Invented by Canadian farmers Wally Satzewich and Gail Vandersteen in the mid-1990s, it"s based on sequentially raising a variety of rapidly growing, highly marketable crops among multiple small (2’ x 25’‘) growing beds.  The idea is to generate maximum edible output using minimal space, simple tools and the municipal water supply. All planting, weeding, pest management and harvesting are done by hand. In this way, a tiny team can raise tons of produce, then sell it directly to the community it serves. 
Through strategic crop-selection, growing and revenue-targeting techniques, the goal is to generate approximately $100 per crop per bed. With about 200 beds per half-acre and up to four rotations per plot, it is theoretically possible to gross up to $120,000 a year, according to a feasibility study funded by Pennsylvania"s Department of Community and Economic Development. Startup costs range from $10,000 to $25,000 and farmers typically work 30 to 60 hours a week. Friends Martin Barrett, 42, and Dan Bravin, 38, of Portland, Oregon, started their City Garden Farms in fall 2007.  SPIN farming "fit a niche that was missing in our plan," says Bravin. "I had gardening skills, Martin had business experience, but we didn"t know how to scale it up or set prices." They expect to sell $24,000 in Community Supported Agriculture shares this year from their half-acre farm, which spans their yard and the yards of 10 neighbors recruited from a post on the classifieds website Craigslist.org. A former database manager and veteran gardener, Bravin farms full time, doing about 85% of the physical labor, while Barrett, a bookstore manager, mostly runs the business side. City Garden takes advantage of Portland"s mild climate and lenient residential-property-use regulations.
Satzewich and Vandersteen, who run Wally"s Market Garden, sell salad greens, rainbow carrots and about 20 other "high value" veggies at a weekly farmers" market in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan in Canada and to restaurants. They earned tens of thousands last year over a 40-week growing period. Their "farm" is three-quarters of an acre cobbled together from patches of lawns rented from or donated by five separate homeowners in Saskatoon and seven plots (including some farmland) in the nearby village of Pleasantdale.
The couple, who have farmed as many as 30 small parcels at a time, devised their technique after running a conventional 20-acre farm. Eventually they realized their city garden was more profitable and easier to manage.  "I asked myself, how can I make [city farming] worth my while?" says Satzewich. "I spent a lot of time making charts and crunching numbers."
A farm stand at Brick City Urban Farms in New Jersey.
© City Garden Farms
Those concepts have been codified in a series of how-to guides written by Satzewich with Roxanne Christensen, former director of the nonprofit Institute for Innovations in Local Farming (IILF), now sold on the SPIN Farming website. Some 2,300 guides have been downloaded to date. The two have held several workshops around the country and there"s a 400-member Google group for current and would-be sub-acre farmers. 
Despite its precise formulas and templates, SPIN is very versatile, compatible with all sorts of farming—biodynamic, permaculture, no-till—anywhere there is land and customers hungry for fresh, locally grown food. As Satzewich says, "It"s about principles. It"s not a religion." 
Indeed, new farms have been applying SPIN principles in a variety of creative ways. John Taylor, 44, of Princeton Junction, New Jersey, formerly a development officer for a charter school, was called to urban farming in his hometown of Newark in response to the city"s lack of access to fresh produce and its proliferation of vacant lots. His partner, Lorraine Gibbons, 52, a former dance company director and Master Gardener, turned him on to SPIN, and in 2008 they started Brick City Urban Farms. Situated in a lot provided by Newark"s Lincoln Park Coast Culture District, the farm sells veggies like collard greens and okra that cater to the tastes of the city"s largely African-American community.
But because Newark"s soil is polluted—"It"s really one big brownfield," says Taylor—Brick City practices a sort of SPIN-mobile.  They plant their crops aboveground in "EarthBoxes," self-contained, window-box-like units with a built-in irrigation and fertilization system, which fit 10 to a SPIN standard bed.  Next year, when the current site is slated for a LEED-certified housing development, they"ll pick up and move the farm to a permanent site two blocks away.
In their trial year, they invested $20,000 in startup costs and sold 20,000 pounds of food and expect to earn a profit this year. They ultimately hope to sell $150,000 per acre on at least five acres of city land, so they can accept food stamps.
The EarthBox is a self-contained unit with built-in irrigation and fertilization.
© Earthbox
SPIN is even being used in the country. Peggy Hanson, a 90-something-year-old widow in rural Illinois, earns supplementary income from the surplus vegetables she and a partner grow on a one-acre plot of a 60-acre tree farm. She"s sold her Indian Trail Farm Produce online since 2006. A SPIN farm "is like World War II victory garden," she says.
SPIN and its spin-offs fit the general downsizing trend in American farming. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture"s 2007 Census of Agriculture, "New farms tend to have more diversified production, fewer acres, lower sales and younger operators."  Moreover, notes Christensen, SPIN farming is being done "without any major policy changes or any government support. It"s totally entrepreneurial in nature."
Of course, SPIN does have its limitations:  Not everyone is cut out for the outdoor lifestyle and physical exertion involved. Bravin notes, "I lost 20 pounds last summer!  But it"s not so much heavy lifting as constant movement." Taylor cautions, "It"s not a turnkey thing," adding that because the concept is still foreign to banks, it can be challenging to get a small-business loan.  Zoning rules may also pose a problem. It all comes down to motivation, says Satzewich: "You"ll do all the work. It"s very dependent on you."
But Christensen is optimistic, saying, "As cities realize the potential and the need for sustainability, they"ll begin to look at food production as part of their infrastructure."

Eco-nomics, Farmland ConneCTions Public Presentation 08 May Tuesday, May 8, 2012, 9:30 am until Noon Milford City Hall, 110 River St, Milford, CT

Farmland ConneCTions, Tuesday, May 8, 2012, 9:30 am until 11:30 Milford City Hall, 110 River St, Milford, CT | FREE Milford ECC Welcomes - Farmland ConneCTions This is a Public Presentation. Please pass this on! Who should attend: Anyone interested in farming, Economic Development Personnel, Entrepreneurs, Farmers, Community Gardens, Soup Kitchens-Pantries, Mayors, Local Businesses, Municipal Land Management, Educators, etc... Did you know that Milford has 2,500 acres of open space? Did you know that our once vibrant farming heritage is nearly gone and that most of our open space is unmanaged and in very poor ecological health? Did you know that now for the first time in our lifetimes it is possible to revive our farming heritage, feed ourselves with local organic food, create local green jobs, and restore our open spaces naturally at virtually no cost to taxpayers? If you would like to learn more about how Milford can join cities and towns throughout Connecticut in taking charge of their natural heritage in responsible and sustainable ways, please join our workshop on May 8, 2012 at 9:30am, City Hall, 110 River ST. Milford CT. Milford ECC welcomes Jennifer McTiernan from the Connecticut Farmland ConneCTions Outreach service. At this workshop Jennifer will discuss/....... Farmland ConneCTions Presentation Description: For a municipality, making land available for farming can have many benefits, including helping to connect with area residents or a membership base, as well as reducing the costs of owning and maintaining arable land. Moreover, in some cases, a partnership with the tenant farmer could lead to ways to directly benefit and engage the wider community, such as providing healthy foods to local schools, food banks and pantries. This presentation will begin by introducing the concept of farmland leasing, and will then explore case studies of farms operating on town (or land trust) land. Next, the nuts and bolts of farmland leasing will be discussed, including questions for municipalities regarding preparedness, capacity, and commitment to agriculture as a part of a mission or vision; soil suitability, stewardship objectives, sustainable farming practices, elements of a good lease, and more. Finally, the meeting participants will learn about the Farmland ConneCTions Guide and Outreach Service, which are available to them to assist with successfully execute legal lease agreements with farmers. A Guide for Connecticut Towns, Cities, Institutions and Land Trusts Using or Leasing Farmland - Come prepared http://www.farmland.org/programs/states/ct/Connecticut-Farmland-Leasing-Guide.asp This presentation lasts about 2 hours. Any Questions Call DD Vasseur at 203-283-1441

Environmental Impact of Batteries Used in Electric Cars | eHow.com

Environmental Impact of Batteries Used in Electric Cars | eHow.com

Environmental Impact of Batteries Used in Electric Cars





Environmental Impact of Batteries Used in Electric Cars thumbnail
Electric car
Electric cars are considered environmentally benign vehicles. Many drivers are willing to sacrifice ease because they perceive only environmental benefits from electric vehicles: It may be inconvenient to drive 60 miles, stop to recharge the battery for up to eight hours, but no greenhouse gases are emitted. Innovations in electric car batteries are making it easier to drive farther with decreased recharge periods, but electric car batteries are larger than traditional vehicle batteries, and production results in significant environmental impacts.

  1. Types of Batteries

    • There are six types of electric vehicle batteries: lead-acid, nickle-metal hydride, nickle-cadmium, lithium ion, zinc-air and flywheels. All are composed of metals, processed and manufactured with varying degrees of environmental impacts. Lead-acid batteries are the most environmentally problematic. Lithium ion poses fewer environmental risks but still places a burden on natural resources.

    Mining


    • Large-scale mine operation

      Mining metals is the process by which large volumes of rock containing metal ore are excavated from the earth. To produce commercial-grade metals, the rock ore must be ground into finer particles which undergo subsequent processing to isolate the metals from waste rock.
      Harmful levels of lead, zinc, arsenic, cadmium and lithium can end up in groundwater, surface water and air when waste rock which still contains metal particles is disposed at the site. Rainwater leaches the metals into surrounding soils, groundwater and surface water. In relation to greenhouse gas emissions, heavy machinery used in excavation runs solely on fossil fuels.

    Processing

    • Once the metals are produced, more processing and refining occurs. For example, the lithium used in batteries is refined through electrolysis. During this process, an electric current is passed through the molten material forcing the lithium onto a cathode. A lot of energy and water are required to heat and cool metals during processing, which sends harmful pollutants into the air through emissions.

    Manufacturing


    • Factory

      Electric car batteries are mass produced using assembly lines. Factories are notoriously large consumers of energy. It is likely that electric car battery manufacturers will implement strict energy efficiency protocols and may rely on renewable energy sources, however, energy supplies will be tapped to produce electric car batteries and waste byproducts will need proper disposal.

    Disposal

    • All of the electric car battery types are expected to last up to three years when a replacement will be necessary, resulting in many discarded batteries. There are federal and state laws requiring proper disposal of batteries which produce hazardous waste as metals are leach out unfettered. For that reason, metals in batteries should be recovered before disposal. The stripped batteries should then be disposed into specially designed landfills, i.e., those with liners to prevent leaching of remaining hazardous pollutants into surrounding soils and water. Electric car batteries are expected to cost around $8,000. Proper disposal will add to the cost of replacement.

    Environmental Impacts

    • The mass production of electric car batteries will result in large volumes of metal contaminated waste and place as much demand onto the power grid as traditional vehicle equipment manufacturing. Direct environmental impacts may result in reduced fishery habitat near mine sites, decreased air quality and associated lung ailments near processing facilities, and higher energy costs near factories. Indirect environmental impacts may result from increased fossil fuel use to meet factory demand.

Sponsored Links

References


Read more: Environmental Impact of Batteries Used in Electric Cars | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_6507967_environmental-batteries-used-electric-cars.html#ixzz1tKaiq8Ez

Farmland Connections May 8, Milford City Hall 110 River St. , 9:30 until 11:30. (Open To The Public) Come find out about the ins and outs of leasing land in your community. There's no doubt a lot of people iwill be inspired by the growing enthusiasm for local and sustainable food systems to pursue farming as a business and livelihood, "SPIN boasts that its practices make it possible to run a viable fresh market vegetable operation on as little as 1000 square feet of land or to gross over $50,000 in sales from a half acre farm. SPIN enterprises have been started up in many cities across the US, Canada, Australia, the EU, and South Africa"


Farmland ConneCTions



 
A Guide for Connecticut Towns, Institutions and Land Trusts Using or Leasing Farmland
ConneCTions Guide CoverLand is an essential element of farming, and, after a century of significant farmland loss around the state, access to affordable, productive farmland is one of the greatest challenges that Connecticut farmers face. Farmland owned by towns, institutions and land trusts represents an important source of land for farmers and for local food production.
Whether it’s 5 acres or 100, a community’s, land trust’s or institution’s willingness to lease land to a farmer, or to create its own community farm, can make an important contribution toward growing Connecticut’s farms, food and economy. This guide is intended to help make these farmland “connections” by walking through the legal and practical considerations involved in leasing farmland and providing information and case studies of successful community farms that have been established around the state. We hope that this guide is a useful resource for both those seeking land to grow food and other agricultural products and those seeking to ensure that the farmland they own is put to productive and sustainable agricultural use.
Download the Farmland ConneCtions guide [PDF]
In the News:
Informational Webinar
Kids exploring a garden.This webinar cover issues and topics related to leasing farmland in Connecticut, including tenure options, practical and legal considerations in drafting a lease, and issues that commonly arise in farmland leasing. We also share some examples of community farms and discuss sustainable agriculture methods that may be included in lease agreements. This presentation is intended to share much of the content of our newly-released guide, Farmland ConneCTions: A Guide for Connecticut Towns, Land Trusts, and Institutions Using or Leasing Farmland.

Download the Presentations
Connecticut Agricultural Business Management GuideConnecticut Agricultural Business Management Guide
The Connecticut Farm Risk Management and Crop Insurance Program, an initiative of the University of Connecticut Cooperative Extension System, seeks to improve farm financial management and reduce risk.
The Connecticut Agricultural Business Management Guide [PDF] is designed primarily for the agricultural producer in Connecticut. It covers basic information dealing with developing a strategy for getting into business, setting up and conducting a business in Connecticut, and provides a primer on the various rules and regulations in Connecticut that every agricultural business owner should know. It can also be used by advisors to agricultural producers as a reference tool.
Model Lease Agreements
For additional information about farm leasing, including sample leases, please visit:
For more information, contact:



Jennifer McTiernan H.
Project Coordinator
Farmland ConneCTions Service
UConn Cooperative Extension System
FarmlandConnections@gmail.com
(c) 203-909-6411
office/meeting days: Tuesdays and Thursdays

Why Farm?

SPIN farming: agricultural business planning on micro-scale land bases — Sustainable Agriculture — Penn State Extension

SPIN farming: agricultural business planning on micro-scale land bases

Posted: September 29, 2009
At the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture’s Farming for the Future Conference this past February, there were no doubt a lot of people in attendance who were inspired by the growing enthusiasm for local and sustainable food systems to pursue farming as a business and livelihood. But would-be growers often encounter two seriously intimidating entry barriers to making a go in farming: access to the land and capital that starting a farm venture requires. Fortunately, opportunities in urban and peri-urban environments may offer a way around these barriers and a path towards viable, small-scale agricultural enterprises.
SPIN farming takes advantage of available land in urban backyards.
SPIN farming takes advantage of available land in urban areas.
SPIN (Small Plot INtensive) farming offers a blueprint to success in urban agriculture and was the subject of a workshop at the 2010 PASA conference.  The workshop was hosted by Andy Pressman of the National Center for Appropriate Technologies (NCAT, www.ncat.org) and was well
ttended by a variety of home gardeners and entrepreneurs excited by the possibility of starting a business in urban agriculture.
The SPIN brand is the trademark of SPIN farming LLC, an outfit that Pressman describes as a “multinational diversified cottage industry,” and is itself an interesting example of entrepreneurship in the sustainable agriculture movement. Drawing on the expertise of renowned urban grower Wally Satzewich and other pioneers in the area of urban and small scale agriculture, SPIN farming LLC director Roxanne Cristensen and colleagues have developed a set of practices, technologies, and business models that can lead to successful farm ventures on sub-acre land bases with small amounts of start-up capital. SPIN markets this knowledge as a for-profit venture through a series of publications, seminars, and workshops that assist growers in launching new businesses. SPIN maintains a website at www.spinfarming.com which serves as clearing house for information and resources on small scale urban agriculture.
Although SPIN methods can be integrated with other concepts in sustainable agriculture including organic and biodynamic farming, Mr. Pressman points out that SPIN is a “production system not a belief system.”  Key features of the SPIN method include thoughtfully sequenced rotations of high value crops that maximize revenues from small areas as well as template business models that aid growers with budgets and financing.  SPIN boasts that its practices make it possible to run a viable fresh market vegetable operation on as little as 1000 square feet of land or to gross over $50,000 in sales from a half acre farm.   SPIN enterprises have been started up in many cities across the US, Canada, Australia, the EU, and South Africa.  Growers in all these places take from SPIN ideas that make sense for their markets and environments, and develop new techniques on their own to help their businesses work.
To spur adoption of SPIN methods and the growth of urban agriculture more broadly, NCAT has recently partnered with SPIN farming LLC.  NCAT is a federal program targeting the advancement of a wide range of sustainable energy and agricultural approaches, and Mr. Pressman serves as the spokesperson for the project with SPIN.
Although Mr. Pressman did not have access to statistics on the number of successful business using SPIN methods nationally, he expressed confidence that SPIN practices and urban agriculture business will enjoy increased growth in the future.  The SPIN website includes a list of successful farms in locations ranging from Atlanta, GA to Newark, NJ.  These farms are growing a wide variety of fresh market vegetables on land bases ranging from large urban lots to distributed networks of backyards and micro-scale plots.  These businesses take advantage of a range of market opportunities available in cities, including farmers markets, CSAs, and restaurant contracts.
Although there was plenty of enthusiasm at the PASA session, several attendees did express skepticism about some inherent challenges in urban agriculture.  These included concerns about contaminated soils or industrial legacies on vacant lots and issues with finding viable land tenure agreements on properties that may frequently change owners or be developed for alternate uses.  Pressman responded that many “cities and municipalities are very interested in urban agriculture and sustainable practices, especially during these hard economic times.”  He was confident that if enthusiasm for urban agriculture is maintained, urban communities and governments would be able to work out a variety of solutions for these challenges.
With an increasing proportion of the world’s population concentrated in big cities, making urban agriculture successful will likely emerge as a fundamental piece of the sustainable agriculture puzzle.   And while urban environments may seem like unlikely places to pursue a career in farming, many cities do have an abundance of vacant lots or even backyards that could be put immediately to productive use.  SPIN has developed tested methods for how to use small land bases productively and capitalize on resources that urban areas offer in abundance, including a variety of easily accessible markets, and micro-level financing sources. As the need for fresh, nutritious food in major cities continues to increase, SPIN and NCAT offer a promising example of a public/private partnership that is working to find solutions.
By Franklin Egan, Graduate Student, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences
Information in this article is from a presentation given at the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture (PASA) Farming for the Future Conference by Andy Pressman, NCAT Agriculture Specialist. Mr. Pressman can be reached at andyp@ncat.org.

Malunggay : The Miracle Vegetable « Agriculture Business Week

Malunggay : The Miracle Vegetable « Agriculture Business Week


“Malunggay” in the Philippines, “Sajina” in the Indian Subcontinent, and “Moringa” in English, it is a popular tree. Many Asians use the leaves of Malunggay (Sajina) like spinach and also the fruit it produces as a vegetable, like asparagus. It only used to be known as a vegetable for lactating mothers. But new scientific studies say that malunggay’s medicinal and market possibilities.
Touted by scientists as a “miracle vegetable,” malunggay has been promoted by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the past 20 years as a low-cost health enhancer in poor countries around the globe.
Malunggay trees are generally grown in the backyards. The small, oval, dark-green leaves are famous vegetable ingredient in soup, fish and chicken dishes. Scientifically, called ‘Moringa oelifera.’ this vegetable, despite its legendary potentials, is still relatively unknown.
“The sale of all forms of vitamins, minerals, and health supplements is a big business,” points out Moringa Zinga, an American company that promotes and sells malunggay products in capsules. “If you are a company selling hundreds of nutritional products, why would you sell a product that will wipe out all your other products? This is true for the pharmaceutical industries as well. These industries would rather that the general public remains ignorant about the moringa leaves.”
According to the Biotechnology Program Office of the Department of Agriculture, the malunggay has been found by biochemists and molecular anthropologists to be rich in vitamins C and A, iron, and high density lipoprotein or good cholesterol.
Due to its high calcium content (four times the calcium in milk), lactating mothers in the Philippines are often advised to consume malunggay leaves to produce more milk for their babies. The young malunggay leaves are being boiled and drink as tea.
Malunggay leaves are loaded with nutrients. Gram for gram, malunggay leaves also contain two times the protein in milk. Likewise, it contains three times the potassium in bananas and four times the vitamin A in carrots.
Health nutritionists claim that an ounce of malunggay has the same Vitamin C content as seven oranges. An important function of vitamin C not known to many is its being an antioxidant. In fact, it has been recognized and accepted by the US Food and Drug Administration as one of the four dietary antioxidants, the others being vitamin E, beta-carotene and selenium. (A dietary oxidant is a substance in food that significantly decreases the adverse effects of harmful chemicals).
There are more health benefits. Vivencio Mamaril, of the Bureau of Plant Industry, told a national daily that in India, malunggay is used in treating various ailments. A 2001 study in India has found that the fresh root of the young tree can be used to treat fever. Asthmatics are advised to drink the infusion from the roots of the plant.
Tender malunggay leaves also reduce phlegm and are administered internally for scurvy and catarrhal conditions, while the flowers are used to heal inflammation of the tendons and abscesses. Unripe pods of malunggay are also reported to prevent intestinal worms, while the fruit also prevents eye disorders.
Other studies have shown that eating malunggay fruits can lead to higher semen count. This is good news for men who are having problems in siring children. They can now count on the malunggay to cork its magic on them.
Because of its nutritional content, malunggay strengthens the immune system, restores skin condition, controls blood pressure, re.ieves headaches and migraines, manages the sugar level thereby preventing diabetes, reduces inflammations and arthritis pains, restricts the growth of tumors, and heals ulcers. This information comes from Dr. Kumar Pati, an Indian doctor who is an expert in natural medicine.
The “next big thing” in Philippine agriculture. That is how the agriculture department considers malunggay. Malunggay can save lives, increase incomes, generate millions of jobs, utilize vast tracts of idle agricultural lands, make the Philippines globally competitive, impact local and international market, and help attain socioeconomic equity,” explained Alice Ilaga, director of the DA’s Biotechnology Program.
Besides being sold in the public market as a vegetable, is there really a market for malunggay products? “The Philippines is currently in the midst of developing the local market for malunggay and its products,” said a statement released by Biotechnology Program, which aggressively aims to develop the agribusiness potentials of various crops as part of the government’s poverty-alleviation program. “Despite being behind other countries such as India and Nicaragua, the Philippines’ malunggay industry is on its way to becoming a global competitor.”
In a press statement, Ilaga reported that the Nutrition Center of the Philippines is setting its sights on fortifying different types of food. “Given its nutritional value, it can be utilized in fortifying sauces, juices, milk, bread, and most importantly, instant noodles,” Ilaga says.
According to Ilaga, a multinational food company reportedly has expressed keen interest in putting up a processing plant in the Philippines for this purpose. “A noodle company is also eyeing malunggay for bio-fortification of noodles as part of its commitment to support the program to fight malnutrition, which is prevalent in the countryside,” she added.
The seeds of malunggay contain 40% oil, which is considered excellent massage oil. As part of its program to promote biotechnology, the agriculture department has strategically positioned itself for the commercial planting of seeds for malunggay oil production.
“The Philippines can penetrate the international market in producing malunggay oil from its seeds using advance technology to extract oil from enzymes,” Ilaga disclosed.
One local company that is leading in malunggay production is SECURA International. After entering into malunggay production for more than a year, it expects a bright future for the malunggay industry.
In an interview with a news dispatch, SECURA president Danny Manayaga admits that for the country to really take advantage of the market, it should first ensure that there is enough supply to support it. “‘The market is developing, but up to now, we still don’t know the extent of this market because we have not yet defined our capacity to produce malunggay,” he disclosed.
“We are involved with contract growers from different towns all over the country such as Valencia in Negros Oriental, Masinloc and Botolan in Zambales, Alaminos and Infanta in Pangasinan, and Bamban in Tarlac, which accounts for 150 hectares of our malunggay supply for our current market but it is not enough to sustain the demands for other products such as moringa oil,” Manayaga said.
SECURA needs at least 20,000 hectares to be able to support the available market for malunggay products. Currently, it is involved in processing dehydrated malunggay leaves to produce tea and as an additive to other medicinal plants to produce herbal tea. “This is the only active market that is running for malunggay now,” Manayaga said.
Unknown to many Filipinos, malunggay has the ability to purify water. “The crushed moringa seeds can clear very turbid water,” said Dr. John Sutherland, of Leicester University’s Department of Environmental Technology. He added that powdered malunggay seeds are appropriate for water purification in rural areas of tropical countries.
Planting malunggay trees can also help stabilize soil and contribute to fight against deforestation. The malunggay tree is highly resistant to drought and needs little care. It is fast-growing and lives for average of 50 years. Each tree can produce approximately 10,000 seeds a year. It also makes an excellent fuel and fertilizer.
A tropical species, malunggay can tolerate temperatures up to 48 degrees Centigrade, but 15 degrees to 35 degrees Centigrade is considered best. It grows in areas with annual rainfall of 760 to 2250 millimeters.
Is planting malunggay profitable? According to Ilaga, for a hectare of malunggay, the estimated net income per year is P150,000.
Popularity: 55%

Popularity: 55%

Metrocrops: In The News

Metrocrops: In The News
Milford ECC Welcomes - Farmland ConneCTions Presentation Public Event Tuesday, May 8, 2012, 9:30am – 12pm City Hall 110 River Street, Milford, CT Did you know that Milford has the longest shoreline in Connecticut and over 2,500 acres of open space? Did you know that our once vibrant farming heritage is nearly gone and that most of our open space is unmanaged and in very poor ecological health? Did you know that now for the first time in our lifetimes it is possible to revive our farming heritage, feed ourselves with local organic food, create local green jobs, and restore our open spaces naturally at virtually no cost to taxpayers? If you would like to lear more about how Milford can join cities and towns throughout Connecticut in taking charge of their natural heritage in responsible and sustainable ways, please join our workshop on May 8, 2012 at 9:30am, City Hall, 110 River ST. Milford CT. Milford ECC welcomes Jennifer McTiernan from the Connecticut Farmland ConneCTions Outreach service. At this workshop Jennifer will....... Farmland ConneCTions Presentation Description: For a municipality, making land available for farming can have many benefits, including helping to connect with area residents or a membership base, as well as reducing the costs of owning and maintaining arable land. Moreover, in some cases, a partnership with the tenant farmer could lead to ways to directly benefit and engage the wider community, such as providing healthy foods to local schools, food banks and pantries. This presentation will begin by introducing the concept of farmland leasing, and will then explore case studies of farms operating on town (or land trust) land. Next, the nuts and bolts of farmland leasing will be discussed, including questions for municipalities regarding preparedness, capacity, and commitment to agriculture as a part of a mission or vision; soil suitability, stewardship objectives, sustainable farming practices, elements of a good lease, and more. Finally, the meeting participants will learn about the Farmland ConneCTions Guide and Outreach Service, which are available to them to assist with successfully execute legal lease agreements with farmers. A Guide for Connecticut Towns, Cities, Institutions and Land Trusts Using or Leasing Farmland - Come prepared http://www.farmland.org/programs/states/ct/Connecticut-Farmland-Leasing-Guide.asp This presentation lasts about 2 hours. Questions Call DD Vasseur at 203-283-1441 Helpful Links: http://www.emagazine.com/view/?4722&src http://metrocrops.com/html/in_the_news.html http://www.earthtimes.org/going-green/urban-farming-offers-green-benefits/1042/ http://www.growingpower.org/

Milford Earth Day, April 14 2012,

EISENHOWER PARK, SCHEDULE: 8:00 AM Arrive at EISENHOWER PARK (lower parking field) for registration & breakfast snacks. 8:30 AM Opening Ceremonies 8:45 AM FREE buses to WORK SITES around town 9:00 AM At each WORK SITE, follow your site leader to pick up trash, clear trails, and more. 12:30 PM FREE buses back to EISENHOWER PARK 1:00 PM Eat lunch and celebrate Earth Day with lots of fun activities! 3:00 PM, Closing Ceremony
EISENHOWER PARK

April 14

2012's Milford Earth Day is going to be a phenomenal success.
Vincent Piselli, Earth Day's Fearless Leader has a schedule of activities planned.
See the site for details. http://www.milfordearthday.org/ April 14, 2012 from 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM
One of Milford ECC's activities is an Earth Day Plant Swap/give away, This first annual plant swap will be small but next year it will be the envy of CT Plant Swaps and sales! Drop off your plant donation anytime from 8am to 12noon. Open to the Public

Join us at Eisenhower Park for an Earth Day celebration and plant swap!
Bring plants, cuttings, seedlings or seeds to share and take some home for your own garden.
Saturday, April 14, 2012 from 12:00am – 2:00pm, I'll be there at 8am for anyone who wants to drop off plants for swapping or just giving away at the ECC Table! We will have a green table cloth and an ECC Banner!

Special thanks to Barrett Outdoor Communications. The Billboard was a catalyst, Milford Earth Day is born! I'll never underestimate the catalyzing power of a billboard. Thanks to Milford's Earth Day Hero's Vincent Piselli & Crew and Barrett Outdoor Communications!

Vincent has lots of activities for volunteers. See the site for details. http://www.milfordearthday.org/ April 14, 2012 from 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM
Posted by DD Vasseur at 4:25am

In this Wednesday, April 11, 2012 photo provided by the Amarillo/Potter/Randall Office of Emergency Management a motorist sits in a truck partially buried in slushy hail near Amarillo, Texas. Weather service crews are assessing the damage from a Texas Panhandle storm that dumped several feet of nickel-sized hail, stranded motorists in muddy, hail drifts and closed a highway for several hours. National Weather Service Meteorologist Justyn Jackson said Thursday that hail that fell amid a rainstorm the day before was real small but 'there was a lot of it' in a concentrated area, accumulating 2- to 4-feet deep.

In this Wednesday, April 11, 2012 photo provided by the Amarillo/Potter/Randall Office of Emergency Management a motorist sits in a truck partially buried in slushy hail near Amarillo, Texas. Weather service crews are assessing the damage from a Texas Panhandle storm that dumped several feet of nickel-sized hail, stranded motorists in muddy, hail drifts and closed a highway for several hours. National Weather Service Meteorologist Justyn Jackson said Thursday that hail that fell amid a rainstorm the day before was real small but 'there was a lot of it' in a concentrated area, accumulating 2- to 4-feet deep.

MILFORD EARTH DAY - EISENHOWER PARK, MILFORD, CT - April 14, 2012 - DONATE / LEND

MILFORD EARTH DAY - EISENHOWER PARK, MILFORD, CT - April 14, 2012 - DONATE / LEND 


Indian Man Plants a Forest, by Himself

Indian Man Plants a Forest, by Himself


 

Milford Earth Day, Milford ECC will have a table and have put together a community plant swap/ give away. next year we are planning a native plant table swap, a most invasive plant presentation, and an exhibit of Deer-Resistant Plants, The benefits of Coyotes - Lyme disease and the deer / whited footed mouse connection and how Coyotes may break the cycle!

Organic lawn care professional can join Milford ECC's table on April 14 for free! Call 203-283-1441 7:30pm April 13 Call DD Vasseur 15 Deer-Resistant Plants - Fine Gardening Article

15 Deer-Resistant Plants

Do your deer leap your fences and laugh at sprayed repellent? Try planting something they don't like.

Photo/Illustration: Jennifer Brown
John Van Etten, former grounds superintendent at the Mohonk Mountain House in upstate New York, recommends 15 plants that deer won't eat; your experience, of course, may differ. For a list of deer-resistant plants in your area, contact your local extension agent.

To learn more about the plants shown below, click on the images to see their Plant Guide Profiles.

For even more options, visit Fine Gardening's Plant Guide, which currently lists 195 deer-tolerant plants. From that list, you can narrow your selections by zone, color, and several other characteristics.

Perennials and annuals

1. Angelonias (Angelonia angustifolia cvs.), annual 1. Angelonias (Angelonia angustifolia cvs.), annual Photo/Illustration: Jennifer Benner
2. Basket of gold (Aurinia saxatilis), Zones 4-8 (Plant Guide profile is unavailable.)

Photo by gardentrek 2. Basket of gold (Aurinia saxatilis), Zones 4-8 (Plant Guide profile is unavailable.)
Photo by gardentrek
3. Bleeding hearts (Dicentra spectabilis), Z3-9 3. Bleeding hearts (Dicentra spectabilis), Z3-9 Photo/Illustration: Jennifer Benner
4. Globe amaranth (Gomphrena globosa), annual 4. Globe amaranth (Gomphrena globosa), annual Photo/Illustration: Michelle Gervais
5. Lamb's ear (Stachys byzantina), Z4-8 5. Lamb's ear (Stachys byzantina), Z4-8 Photo/Illustration: Michelle Gervais
6. Lantanas (Lantana spp. and cvs.), annual 6. Lantanas (Lantana spp. and cvs.), annual Photo/Illustration: Melissa Lucas
7. Lily-of-the-valley (Convallaria majalis), Z2-7 7. Lily-of-the-valley (Convallaria majalis), Z2-7 Photo/Illustration: Michelle Gervais
8. Russian sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia), Z6-9 8. Russian sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia), Z6-9 Photo/Illustration: Michelle Gervais
9. Snapdragons (Antirrhinum majus cvs.) annual 9. Snapdragons (Antirrhinum majus cvs.) annual Photo/Illustration: Melissa Lucas
10. Spider flowers (Cleome hassleriana cvs.) annual (Plant Guide profile is unavailable.)

Photo by Carl E. Lewis  10. Spider flowers (Cleome hassleriana cvs.) annual (Plant Guide profile is unavailable.)
Photo by Carl E. Lewis 

Trees and shrubs

11. Beautybush (Kolkwitzia amabilis), Z5-9 11. Beautybush (Kolkwitzia amabilis), Z5-9 Photo/Illustration: Steve Aitken
12. Chaste trees (Vitex spp. and cvs.), Z6-9 12. Chaste trees (Vitex spp. and cvs.), Z6-9 Photo/Illustration: Bill Johnson
13. Daphnes (Daphne X burkwoodii cvs), Z5-8 13. Daphnes (Daphne X burkwoodii cvs), Z5-8 Photo/Illustration: Stephanie Fagan
14. Shadbushes (Amelanchier spp. and cvs.), Z4-9 14. Shadbushes (Amelanchier spp. and cvs.), Z4-9 Photo/Illustration: Jennifer Benner
15. Spireas (Spiraea spp. and cvs.), Z4-9 15. Spireas (Spiraea spp. and cvs.), Z4-9 Photo/Illustration: courtesy of Bailey Nurseries
John Van Etten's article "Getting to Know the Enemy" appears in Fine Gardening #88.
From Fine Gardening 88 , pp. 44

Milford ECC's Official Photographer - (Zak DePiero) Wall Photos Facebook Milford Fire Photo,

Wall Photos | Facebook:

(Milford, CT 2012 A small fire, 75% of what ignited at Beaver Brook was Phragmites Australis fire erupted shortly after 6pm Monday in Milford which caused Metro-North to halt train service in the area for part of the evening. It appears that most of the fire has been burning itself out but it is spread out over a very large area. Photo: Stephen Krauchick / Connecticut Post freelance

A major brush fire erupted shortly after 6pm Monday in Milford which caused Metro-North to halt train service in the area for part of the evening. It appears that most of the fire has been burning itself out but it is spread out over a very large area. Photo: Stephen Krauchick / Connecticut Post freelance

 Hi Diane - If the opportunity comes up to discuss it - You can let people know that over 75% of what ignited @ Beaver Brook was Phragmites Australis.

It looks like all the "Frag"  that wasn't in actual standing water burned.  

An active forest mgt. program would have eliminated that as a fuel source.   It should have had a mix of species that are found in a cattail marsh.   It would have supported much more wildlife too in addition to satisfying plan of Conservation and development goals.  

.....  and would actually be profitable in the end.  

All of this has been proposed - maybe people will listen this time? 


Milford's burned area may turn out to be one of the less tick infested areas to enjoy walking!

The timely use of prescribed fire (judiciously administered by experienced natural resource professionals) can effectively reduce and control populations of some ticks and other internal parasites. Slow moving prescribed burns (e.g. backfires) performed under adequate fuel loads and environmental conditions, generate temperatures sufficient to kill or physically damage ticks and other parasites on rangelands and improved pastures. The benefits of initial tick reduction extend beyond the acute impact of burning, as fire also removes the leaf litter, undergrowth, and shrubby hardwood vegetation rendering the soil-vegetation interface less hospitable for off-host tick survival. Prescribed fire also hastens nutrient recycling to soil microbes, improving the productivity of top soils and resulting in increased forage availability for grazing livestock.